Search Results: "Helen E. Fisher"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Many will be convinced by her knowledgeable, persuasive, and entertaining discussion—and the more skeptical will find fascinating tidbits for thought along the way."
Fisher (The Sex Contract, 1981)—research associate at the American Museum of Natural History, former ``house anthropologist'' for The Today Show, and one of our best science-popularizers—may find a large readership for her subject here: the influence of evolutionary biology and genetics on sex, love, marriage, divorce, and today's family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"One doubts whether most feminists, like Fisher, will sleep easier at night in the belief that women's equality is thus assured."
A pat biological rationalization for the purportedly improving position of women under the economic conditions of global capitalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Zesty popular science, with a nice blend of historical lore and personal observation."
A terrific popular history of hurricanes by cosmochemist and novelist Fisher (Marine Geology and Geophysics/Univ. of Miami; The Wrong Man, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A flimsy frame for some bright polar portraits. (Photos—color and b&w—not seen.)"
Uneven mix of travelogue and polar history, as Fisher (Environmental Sciences/Univ. of Miami; Hostage One, 1989, etc.) sails on the first surface vessel to reach the North Pole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Given Dowding's extracurricular activities, one can understand why Churchill canned him. Still, Fisher's portrait of the dotty Dowding is a pleasure to read."
Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the hyperrational Sherlock Holmes, believed in fairies and ghosts. Why should a pioneer of radar defense systems not have done the same? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WRONG MAN by David E. Fisher
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Follett crowd."
Fisher is a Bo Jackson of writing, an author whose yen to excel in two literary arenas—thrillers (Hostage One, 1989, etc.) and popular science (Across the Top of the World, 1992, etc.) seems to spread his talent a bit thin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

Cogent technological exposition combines with Saturday- matinee melodrama to create a nearly moving saga of the many men who wanted singlehandedly to create what one inventor called ``radiovision.'' Beginning with an 1872 experiment on selenium rods that made British engineer Willoughby Smith imagine a system of ``visual telegraphy,'' Scientist David Fisher (Univ. of Miami; The Scariest Place on Earth 1994, etc.) and son, freelance writer Marshall Fisher, chart the scientific progression that culminated with the debut of commercial television programming in 1941. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE DID JOSIE GO? by Helen E. Buckley
Released: April 1, 1999

"Are there ten toes?' (Picture book. 2-7)"
PLB 0-688-16508-7 Buckley's Josie, first spotted in 1962, is as sprightly as ever in Ormerod's illustrations, nimbly eluding her family's search. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOONLIGHT KITE by Helen E. Buckley
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1997

"Primavera captures the magic of moonlight on the sea, candlelight on ancient stone, and kite tails snapping against a backdrop of stars. (Picture book. 5-10)"
A thoroughly captivating story from Buckley (``Take Care of Things,'' Edward Said, 1991, etc.) about three monks, the last of their order, who labor in lonely silence in a crumbling monastery on a hilltop, forgotten by the villagers below. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

'TAKE CARE OF THINGS,' EDWARD SAID by Helen E. Buckley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 16, 1991

"Unassuming but just right, with well-drawn, sympathetic illustrations that nicely reflect the story's warmth and realism. (Tom seems to be Oriental; other characters, including Mom and Dad, are Caucasian.) (Picture book. 3-7)"
A preschooler's first day with his babysitter and several pets when his much-admired older brother goes back at school. Read full book review >