Search Results: "Helen Foster James"


BOOK REVIEW

MOMMY LOVES YOU by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 5, 2017

"In the end, this joins the crowded ranks of cute books in verse vying for new mothers' attention and doesn't really stand out. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Following titles dedicated to grandmas and grandpas, the author-illustrator duo tackles mothers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDPA LOVES YOU! by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A beloved grandparent gift purchase to be sure but also a toddler-friendly inclusion to an intergenerational storytime. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A grandfather rabbit celebrates the birth of a new baby bunny and recounts the many adventures they will have. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN by Anita Mishook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A well-structured, compelling historical tale.
"
A young, Jewish, Polish-American immigrant moves from New York to California and reluctantly infiltrates a pro-Nazi organization in this novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DADDY'S GIRL by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"Pair with Hammer and Nails for another look at daddy-daughter time that isn't so determinedly girly. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A young girl enjoys tea with her dad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDMA'S CHRISTMAS WISH by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Perhaps a little too sweet in tone for some, but most grandmas would love to read this to a grandchild. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A gray grandma bunny expresses her love for her little bunny grandbaby in this sweetly sentimental sequel to Grandma Loves You! (2013). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDMA LOVES YOU! by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2013

"An unabashedly idealized but nevertheless wholehearted hymn to grandmotherhood (Picture book. 2-4)"
The arrival of a new grandchild is joyously celebrated in this grandmotherly ode to their new life together. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOSTER CARE by Nancy Millichap Davies
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1994

"B&w photo insert; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
In The Changing Family series, a journalist surveys the history and current status of foster care and the issues involved in placing children outside their immediate families. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Elizabeth MacLeod
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The lack of notes, bibliography or online resources further mar this book. (Biography. 6-8)"
Helen Keller's inspiring story has a way of making it into most elementary-school curricula. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by George Sullivan
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Satisfying the requirement for 100-page biography reports, this adds little else to the field. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
The compelling lives of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan are interwoven with quotations from their own writing in a choppy, flat, rehashing of the now-familiar story of Keller's vast potential and the brilliant teaching skills that grew to make Helen's social and intellectual life rich, but negated any semblance of a personal life for Anne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE AMERICA by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"More a sure-fire flop than a patriotic primer. (Board book. 3-4) "
It's unlikely little ones will garner much appreciation for the U.S. of A. from these trivial riddles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Lesa Cline-Ransome
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2008

"A nice introduction to a fascinating life for the very youngest of readers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Young Helen Keller cannot hear, see or speak, but she knows the scent of vanilla cake coming out of the oven, the feel of her mother's fancy silk dress and that the dog is tense because the horses are outside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Laurie Lawlor
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

Helen Keller was a hero and an icon in her own age as well as in ours: she lost her sight and hearing at 19 months; she was brought into the world of language by a young and fiercely determined teacher; she went to college, supported herself, and published voluminously at a time when women could scarcely do those things at all, let alone as disabled women. Read full book review >