Search Results: "Helen Keith"


BOOK REVIEW

ARMADILLO TATTLETALE by Helen Ketteman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Rarely is learning a lesson this much fun. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Reminiscent of Aesop's Fables, Ketteman (Shoeshine Whittaker, 1999, etc.) tells a mirthful moral tale wherein a busybody armadillo learns the consequences of eavesdropping and gossiping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE GREEN PEAS by Keith Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 22, 2014

"Sweet—but alas, not a three-pea-t. (Picture book. 3-7)"
After tackling the alphabet and numbers in two previous excursions (LMNO Peas, 2013; 1-2-3 Peas, 2012), Baker's winsome legumes return for a third ap-pea-rance, exploring nine colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAMPING by Keith Baker
by Keith Baker, illustrated by Keith Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"Engaging, sitcom-style humor based on personality differences and securely attuned to the intended audience. (Early reader. 4-6)"
A practical alligator and her more excitable husband plan a camping trip in this slightly reformatted chapter taken from Meet Mr. and Mrs. Green (2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LMNO PEAS by Keith Baker
Kirkus Star
by Keith Baker, illustrated by Keith Baker
ABC BOOKS
Released: April 5, 2010

"Peas out. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A passel of industrious peas narrates inventive, alphabetically arranged avocations: "We are peas—alphabet peas! / We work and play in the ABCs." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE GREEN by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"This simple, satisfying story will work well with two- and three-year-olds right up to first-graders, and the large full-page and full-spread illustrations and lively text make this a fine choice for story hours with bird or artist themes. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A young artist observes a hummingbird named Little Green that flits from flower to flower outside the boy's window. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCLE BLUBBAFINK’S SERIOUSLY RIDICULOUS STORIES by Keith Graves
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"But it's hard to imagine an adult able to bear reading it to them. (Picture book. 7-10)"
"OK, so I'm Uncle Blubbafink. Hello already. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANTIQUE STORE CAT by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Quiet, but a sure bet for cat-lovers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Alice, introduced in The Third-Story Cat (1987), is wandering again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY OCTOPUS ARMS by Keith Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Though a little on the bland side, this effort should reassure little ones resting in the human arms of favorite story readers. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Who hasn't occasionally wished for more than two hands (or arms) in order to simultaneously accomplish all that one needs to? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HICKORY DICKORY DOCK by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2007

"A great addition to the collection of 'singing' books, with the added bonus of helping readers practice counting and time-telling skills. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The familiar nursery rhyme gains new verses in this latest from Baker, who rounds out the rest of the mouse's busy hours. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORE MR. AND MRS. GREEN by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2004

The big-hearted alligators introduced in Meet Mr. and Mrs. Green (2002, but reformatted as an easy reader, too) return for three more feel-good episodes. Mr. Green catches fish after fish, leaving Mrs. Green "frustrated and fishless" until he shares his secret bait: jellybeans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COCK-A-DOODLE MOOOO! by Keith DuQuette
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"Not only does this make an inviting lead-in to Peter Sís's similar flights of fancy in Jack Prelutsky's Scranimals (2002), but may well induce young viewers to take up DuQuette's invitation, and craft a few 'mythical' animals of their own. (Picture book. 7-11)"
Between portraits of a griffin, cockatrice, and other portmanteau creatures from world folklore, DuQuette sandwiches a dozen big, precisely detailed, fanciful hybrids of his own, from a furred-and-feathered "Cooster" (cow rooster) perched on a—fortunately sturdy—fence rail, to a coterie of fluffy pink "Squoodles" (squid poodle) drifting elegantly through turquoise waters. Read full book review >