Search Results: "Helen Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

BEYOND BELIEF by Helen Smith
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 28, 2014

"Emily (Invitation to Die, 2013, etc.) returns in an equal-opportunity satire of those who believe in the paranormal and those who exploit the believers. It's an enjoyable tale with a leisurely buildup, though readers in search of a fast-moving mystery will be fidgeting long before the first murder."
When a psychic foresees death at a seaside convention, even the most cynical learn that they'd better pay attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PIPKIN OF PEPPER by Helen Cooper
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 6, 2005

"Cooper's Pumpkin Soup (1999) won the Kate Greenaway medal; this one's at least as charming. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Cat, Squirrel and Duck, who live in a tea kettle-shaped house, are back to making their pumpkin soup when they discover they are out of salt—the only solution is to go into the city to buy more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S MY BIRTHDAY by Helen Oxenbury
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"The pencil and pale wash illustrations are also distinctive Oxenbury: amiable, affectionate, and like old pals by the end of the story. (Picture book. 2+)"
A sweet young epicene sets out to bake a birthday cake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLARA'S CRAZY CURLS by Helen Poole
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"Skip this; for celebrations of curly splendor, get bell hooks' Happy to Be Nappy, illustrated by Chris Raschka (1999), and Carolivia Herron's Nappy Hair, illustrated by Joe Cepeda (1997), instead. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little girl's very large curls cause chaos in this clunky lesson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DESERT ELEPHANTS by Helen Cowcher
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 30, 2011

"Visually appealing, but more likely to puzzle than inform. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Desert-dwelling elephants journey south through the "Elephant's Doorway" toward Burkina Faso when the dry season begins in Mali. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLEABAG by Helen Stephens
ANIMALS
Released: July 20, 2010

"Just dazzling. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Two kindred souls find friendship and home in this heartwarming tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROOSTER AND THE FOX by Helen Ward
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Younger readers may skip over the final section (particularly as it's printed in vanishingly tiny type)—no matter: they are sure to linger over the sumptuous art and to get the point of this ageless fable. (Picture book/folktale. 7-10)"
Virtuosic animal portraits adorn this lively retelling of Chaucer's "Nun's Priest's Tale." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANIMALS’ CHRISTMAS CAROL by Helen Ward
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"The story is a gentle tribute to the animals' role in the Nativity, and a reminder that even the smallest and lowliest have gifts to give that are fit for a king. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The wise men were not the only ones who gave gifts to the newborn Jesus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TATTY RATTY by Helen Cooper
ANIMALS
Released: March 14, 2002

"Parents of young children will definitely want to keep this tale in mind should their child's own Tatty Ratty take off. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A lost favorite toy is the impetus behind this tale of the adventure one rabbit might be having when he is away from home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHISTLING THORN by Helen Cowcher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"An intriguing bit of natural history, emblematic of nature's intricate, delicate balance. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
Again, an outstandingly beautiful offering from Cowcher (Tigress, 1991), this time in a simple, fascinating explanation of the acacia's symbiotic adaptation—which allows it to survive despite the giraffe's fondness for its leaves—that is almost a pourquoi tale: Long ago, both giraffes and rhinos enjoyed the acacia, but rhinos didn't damage the trees as did the giraffes, which reached even the highest branches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIGRESS by Helen Cowcher
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 23, 1991

"Still, a stunningly beautiful book that addresses an important issue with compassion—and with more balance and subtlety than its predecessors. (Picture book. 4+)"
Cowcher continues to present environmental concerns (Rain Forest, 1989, etc.)—here, with a tigress that comes out of a forest sanctuary to kill a bullock, and later a camel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? by Helen Borten
Released: March 25, 1960

"Possibly a doubtful task on a scientific level, the connection of the senses does work very well poetically, and this text accompanied by the author's stylized illustrations should limber up even the most sluggish imaginations."
This is a book of common experiences as they are manifest in sound. Read full book review >