Search Results: "Helen Stephens"


BOOK REVIEW

FLEABAG by Helen Stephens
ANIMALS
Released: July 20, 2010

"Just dazzling. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Two kindred souls find friendship and home in this heartwarming tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN by Anita Mishook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A well-structured, compelling historical tale.
"
A young, Jewish, Polish-American immigrant moves from New York to California and reluctantly infiltrates a pro-Nazi organization in this novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AHOYTY-TOYTY by Helen Stephens
ANIMALS
Released: April 13, 2004

"Those grappling with similar situations will appreciate this tale's satisfying conclusion. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Two pampered pups learn a lesson about friendship is this sweet and simple story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE HORSE by Helen Stephens
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"This warmly reassuring tale is ideal to share with hesitant little ones. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A tender-hearted tale about overcoming the pangs of social anxiety. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT ABOUT ME? by Helen Stephens
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Casting a toddler as the adult provides a role model in socialization and leadership for little ones; sturdy pages make the book easy to handle and attractive to its intended audience. (Picture book. 1-4)"
This entry in the Toddler Story Book series centers on a common desire: the wish to be the center of attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Elizabeth MacLeod
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The lack of notes, bibliography or online resources further mar this book. (Biography. 6-8)"
Helen Keller's inspiring story has a way of making it into most elementary-school curricula. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by George Sullivan
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Satisfying the requirement for 100-page biography reports, this adds little else to the field. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
The compelling lives of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan are interwoven with quotations from their own writing in a choppy, flat, rehashing of the now-familiar story of Keller's vast potential and the brilliant teaching skills that grew to make Helen's social and intellectual life rich, but negated any semblance of a personal life for Anne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUIGLEYS by Simon Mason
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 14, 2002

"Plentiful line drawings extend the fun. (Fiction. 7-10)"
As droll as a Britcom and as true to the spirit of family life as the all-American Quimbys, this import introduces the Quigleys: siblings Lucy and Will and their slightly feckless but loving parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Lesa Cline-Ransome
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2008

"A nice introduction to a fascinating life for the very youngest of readers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Young Helen Keller cannot hear, see or speak, but she knows the scent of vanilla cake coming out of the oven, the feel of her mother's fancy silk dress and that the dog is tense because the horses are outside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN KELLER by Laurie Lawlor
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

Helen Keller was a hero and an icon in her own age as well as in ours: she lost her sight and hearing at 19 months; she was brought into the world of language by a young and fiercely determined teacher; she went to college, supported herself, and published voluminously at a time when women could scarcely do those things at all, let alone as disabled women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUIGLEYS NOT FOR SALE by Simon Mason
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 9, 2004

"Perfect for the new chapter-book reader with a skewed sense of humor and for the adults who read aloud to them. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Mr. and Mrs. Quigley and their children, Will and Lucy, have managed to stay alive for another installment of their exciting and entertaining lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELEN HATH NO FURY by Gillian Roberts
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 5, 2000

"Some funny lines, even some wise ones, but the pace is slow and the territory overfamiliar."
Even though Edna Pontellier is fictitious—the embattled heroine of Kate Chopin's The Awakening—it's clear Helen Coulter takes her self-drowning personally. Read full book review >