Search Results: "Helen Ward"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ROOSTER AND THE FOX by Helen Ward
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Younger readers may skip over the final section (particularly as it's printed in vanishingly tiny type)—no matter: they are sure to linger over the sumptuous art and to get the point of this ageless fable. (Picture book/folktale. 7-10)"
Virtuosic animal portraits adorn this lively retelling of Chaucer's "Nun's Priest's Tale." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANIMALS’ CHRISTMAS CAROL by Helen Ward
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"The story is a gentle tribute to the animals' role in the Nativity, and a reminder that even the smallest and lowliest have gifts to give that are fit for a king. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The wise men were not the only ones who gave gifts to the newborn Jesus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE by Aesop
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A visual stunner. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In this splendid retelling of Aesop's familiar fable, a country mouse leaves his bucolic existence to sample the glitz and glam of the city, only to discover there's absolutely no place like home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNWITTING WISDOM by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Turning the perfectly simple into the ostentatious, Ward has forgotten that 'fine feathers do not make fine birds.' (Picture book/folktales. 7-12)"
The title of this overblown exercise is just wrong: whoever Aesop was, that teller was deeply aware of the wisdom in the fables. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VARMINTS by Helen Ward
by Helen Ward, illustrated by Marc Craste
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 25, 2008

"Perhaps it'll make more sense on the screen. (Picture book. 7-9, adult)"
Here Ward's brief lament for the loss of nature's peace and quiet to rampant urbanization really gets tricked out by elaborate packaging, occasional translucent pages and Craste's hyper-atmospheric digital art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIN FOREST by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Libraries may be forced to discard the dust jacket, which has a big die-cut hole in the front. (Picture book. 6-8)"
In this parable from Ward (The Animals' Christmas Carol, above, etc.), an old man living in a vast, gray wasteland of "other people's garbage and bad weather" is driven by dreams to recycle it all into a forest of steel trees and tin creatures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOAT by Helen Ward
by Helen Ward, illustrated by Ian Andrew
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2005

"A quiet story, with images of people and landscape inspired by the artist's home town of Portland, Dorset, England. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Washes of muted color against misty grey crosshatching and an elegant font soften this slightly didactic tale with its echoes of Noah and the flood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MOON DOG by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2007

"Young children will pore over the art, cheer at the climactic happy reunion and take Ward's point that 'there is nothing quite so NASTY as a fickle FAIRY and nothing quite so NICE as a faithful FRIEND.' (Picture book. 6-8)"
Fairies and exotic landscapes rendered with Rackham-esque depth illustrate this handsomely designed tale of a pet who falls among risky friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRAGON MACHINE by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"This mild, gentle story is lightweight but peaks with the construction of the wonderfully offbeat dragon machine in the middle. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A pleasant fantasy with more dreamlike quirkiness than substance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Flashy but perfunctory. (Fictionalized nonfiction. 10-12)"
Designed more for a quick flip-through than any sort of serious study, this appendage to 2004's Egyptology looks like a battered notebook of general remarks about ancient Egypt with memorabilia clipped in, compiled by "Emily Sands," the fictive vanished archeologist. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JESMYN WARD
by Maya Payne Smart

National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has stared down truth and rendered it on the page with poignance and precision before. But for her third novel, Sing, Unburied, Sing, Ward forged a fresh set of writing tools—historical research, multiple first-person points of view, and a touch of the supernatural—to grapple with the legacy wounds of American racism.  

Urgent and ...


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BLOG POST

ANNE HELEN PETERSEN
by Megan Labrise

When Anne Helen Petersen pitched Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman in 2015, famous female iconoclasts were having a massive moment.

Amy Schumer’s Trainwreck led the box office. Broad City and Girls ruled TV. Serena Williams dominated tennis. And Hillary Rodham Clinton on her way to becoming the 45th President of the ...


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