Search Results: "Henrik Hovland"


BOOK REVIEW

JOHN JENSEN FEELS DIFFERENT by Henrik Hovland
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"In between giggles, children will find much to think about. (Picture book. 5-9)"
John Jensen lives a perfectly ordinary, one would even say dull, life. So why does he "feel different"? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TERRORIST by Henrik Rehr
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 1, 2015

"Princip, in this contemplative version of history, isn't evil, and he isn't heroic. He's just a hapless man who fired a gun. (Graphic historical fiction. 12-18)"
Graphic novelist Rehr offers a fictionalized biography of Gavrilo Princip, who killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand and started World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KLUTZ by Henrik  Drescher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"These slapstick foibles may scare very young readers, but those old enough to put the goofiness in context will eat up this cacophony of collage. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Stumbling and bumbling their way through life, the members of the Klutz family trip down stairs, spill their meals, and almost drop the baby on its head. ``Lumpish yokels!'' people retort, observing the Klutzes' fumblings as the family clomps ungracefully by in their way-too-big boots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINJA TIMMY by Henrik Tamm
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"More empty calories than full-bodied treat. (Fantasy. 7-9)"
Does ninja cat Timmy have what it takes to save the city's children? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUBERT THE PUDGE by Henrik  Drescher
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"Good, clean vegetarian fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Hubert never expects to grow up: All pudgies are destined for the slaughterhouse before they're a year old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"Drescher's messily energetic cartoon style underscores the parable's sardonic tone. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Drescher doesn't quite get around to the "revenge," but he makes good on the rest of his title in this tale of neighbors who compete in building ad hoc additions to their houses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROTHER JACOB by Henrik Stangerup
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1993

"These three books make an unassailable case for Danish identity in history, but their good intentions (the Kierkegaard scheme) are never quite realized into fiction of special immediacy or high relief."
Danish writer Stangerup completes a trilogy here—a set of works based on Kierkegaard's understanding of the Tripartite Man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDFISH IN THE CHANDELIER by Casie Kesterson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 6, 2012

"It's a pity that the real story behind this actual, extraordinary piece of ornate French décor is withheld, leaving readers cheated of a true exploration of art history. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The fictionalized story behind the creation of a 19th-century chandelier currently on display in the J. Paul Getty Museum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 29, 2013

"An important book that offers rarely heard warnings about the medical profession."
Isager, in this consistently intriguing book, warns that Western medicine is blindly, or perhaps willfully, dismissing symptoms of multisystem illnesses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"David Small (2000) or Alice Provensen's The Buck Stops Here (1990). (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
Home sweet home to every president except Washington, the White House has become an emblematic backdrop to history, as well as an old house with a history of its own—and, for both reasons, has been regarded by its changing cast of residents with mixed feelings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: April 10, 1992

"Blithe and quick, the book could be accused of offering simplistic solutions to problems like unemployment and bullies, as well as crocodile fighting; humor, clearly, would be its winning defense. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Frizzy-haired, knobby-kneed Ruskin Splinter, age nine, believes himself eminently suited to play the lead—a hero capable of slaying dragons—in St. Read full book review >