Search Results: "Herbert Strean"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 30, 1991

"A rather glib treatment of a serious problem that lingers too long on the details of murders and comes up short in its stated aim of showing how we can be more loving, constructive human beings and society can be made more thoughtful and caring."
A plea for compassion for the murderers in our midst, who in the authors' Freudian view, where good and evil do not exist, re pitiable victims, differing from the rest of us not in kind but only in degree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLETTE by Herbert Lottman
Released: Feb. 5, 1990

Life of the great French novelist Sidonie Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954), author of Gigi, Cheri, etc. As in his Albert Camus (1979) and Flaubert (1988), biographer Lottman still writes more as a fact-assembler than as one inspired by his subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Not many other than scholars and the most serious opera enthusiasts, however, will likely be willing to do so."
paper 0-8047-3105-5 There is no doubt that Lindenberger (Opera: The Extravagant Art, not reviewed) knows and loves opera. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 30, 1995

"However, a generally superficial treatment of economics often undercuts his analyses and conclusions."
A collection of recent articles concerning topical economic issues and a life as a public economist that is sometimes informative, occasionally humorous, and never profound. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Most of the other subjects—Reginald Hill, Jeremiah Healy, Catherine Aird, and Barbara Neely—hit Herbert's softballs over the fence too. (Foreword by Antonia Fraser)"
Plotting the contemporary mystery is a tough discipline—a discipline most authors of mainstream fiction would rather spare themselves—to judge from the few consensual opinions expressed in the 13 long interviews that Herbert (editor-in-chief of the forthcoming Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing) conducts with writers from P.D. James to Tony Hillerman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAIN DAMAGE by Herbert Burkholz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1992

"Which it does."
Burkholz's mind-reading government employees (The Sensitives, 1987; Strange Bedfellows, 1988) return as the nation's only defense against the murderous plan of a ruthless and dead CIA chief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"If grade-schoolers are truly equipped to comprehend a past of poll taxes, lynching and institutional hatred in the place of the current pieties, then Kohl's lesson plan will serve them well."
Everything you know about Rosa Parks is wrong—unless you've been studying with education-reform activist Kohl (A Grain of Poetry, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1998

"Nevertheless, this is a book that will recharge a teacher's batteries."
Creed mixed with memoir by a veteran educator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

To Jonah, When You Are Twenty-Five by James Herbert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2014

"A smart memoir, wrapped inside an overly didactic advice book."
Herbert's (Creating the AHRC, 2008) latest book—half epistolary memoir, half advice guide— tells young adults why they should be serious about their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 15, 1995

"The essence of PC educational ideals."
The self-styled radical educator (``I Won't Learn from You,'' 1994, etc.) collects meandering, utterly predictable essays on the importance of narrative in the education of children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOSING OUR WAY by Bob Herbert
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"In vivid anecdotes and moving portraits, Herbert humanizes the many problems he uncovers, and he clearly believes that Americans can, and will, band together to set the nation on a new course."
Former New York Times opinion columnist Herbert (Promises Betrayed: Waking Up from the American Dream, 2005) reports on his cross-country trip investigating the lives of the 99 percent. Read full book review >