Search Results: "Higgins Bond"


BOOK REVIEW

TALLAHASSEE HIGGINS by Mary Downing Hahn
Released: March 23, 1987

"Despite its flaws, a page-turner with a well-drawn protagonist."
Liz was hardly more than a child herself when her daughter Tallahassee was born; 12 years later she still thinks like a teen-ager, a bitter fact that her daughter finally accepts after her first winter away from her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIGGINS HOLE by Kevin Boreen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Steer clear. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
A middle-grade undersea fantasy angles to be a comical clambake but reels in only a damp debacle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PLACE FOR BIRDS by Melissa Stewart
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2009

"Put this one in the hands of budding scientists, environmentalists and nature lovers. (selected bibliography) (Informational picture book. 6-10)"
An accessible introduction to environmental issues, this title focuses on the effects, good and bad, that human behavior has on birds, highlighting the progress that we've made toward living in harmony with our winged friends and acknowledging problems still not solved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2005

"In light of Hurricane Katrina, the uncritical admiration for modern engineering feats seems misguided, but should not deter purchasers who will welcome this engaging and informative presentation. (glossary) (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
Aptly titled, but sadly overtaken by events, this beautiful picture book for older readers is a clever blending of a chronological history with images of a trip downriver from Lake Itasca to the Gulf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO HAS A BELLY BUTTON? by Mary Batten
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2004

"An especially wonderful book to share with youngsters awaiting the birth of a sibling, and a great addition to the nonfiction library collection. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Batten introduces the characteristics that set mammals apart from other animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PLACE FOR BUTTERFLIES by Melissa Stewart
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"While the artwork is worth a look, it does not make up for the heavy-handed conservation message and lack of general information that plagues this text. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 5-8)"
Stewart's latest introduces readers to the habitats of several butterflies found in the U.S., and how people can have a negative impact on them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLEASE DON’T WAKE THE ANIMALS by Mary Batten
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

"Both bedtime book and informational text, this appealing title ends with a short list of books and websites for further research. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-7)"
Beginning and ending with images of human children in bed, this gentle story describes where, when, how often and how long different animals sleep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVEN SEAS by Linda Vieira
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Titles with a narrower focus, such as G. Brian Karas's Atlantic (2002) convey a clearer sense of the oceans' size, diverse biota, and importance. (glossary, maps) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
The illustrations in this sweeping tour of the world's oceans provide more atmosphere than information, and so does the text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG BOND by Charlie Higson
ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 2006

"A page-turning read. (Fiction. YA)"
Adventure, intrigue, romance, pirates, murder, stolen treasures, deception, characters good and bad, teenagers both brave and clever and strange secrets all play a part in this suspenseful second entry in the Young Bond series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2011

"Pacelle is an activist and an optimist who believes that change will come and that, as with every great cause, 'it begins with each one of us.'"
In this debut memoir, Pacelle describes the activities of the Humane Society of the United States, under his direction, and presents the compelling case that by challenging cruelty to animals we are defending our own humanity. Read full book review >