Search Results: "Hilary Hemingway"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 2000

"Hilary honors her father and celebrates her family legacy with this collection of fantastic hunting stories."
Hemingway and Lindsay (Dreamland, 1998) carry the Hemingway traditions of hunting, family, and storytelling into the new millennium. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEMINGWAY by Michael Reynolds
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Aside from occasional slips into floridity, this is a steady, dramatically satisfying, even enlightening look at a major talent and his times. (photos, maps, not seen) (Book-of- the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
The author of a multivolume biography of Hemingway (which began with The Young Hemingway, 1986) continues his fact-packed, engaging exploration of the talent Lionel Trilling called perhaps the most ``publicly developed'' in America's history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1992

Reynolds (English/North Carolina State Univ.) is on installment three of his Hemingway biography (The Young Hemingway, 1986; Hemingway: The Paris Years, 1989), and the leisurely attention he can pay to minutiae in so spread-out and magnified a project both pays off and doesn't. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 2, 1992

"It's a tactful, unpushy thesis but unmistakable, and makes Mellow's book different from its fellows. (Two eight-page photo inserts—not seen.)"
By now, any Hemingway biography is built as much upon the scaffolding of its predecessors as upon the writer's life itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HILARY AND THE LIONS by Frank DeSaix
Released: Oct. 24, 1990

Separated from her parents on a visit to New York, Hilary curls up at the foot of the library lions—which then come to lite and take her on a city tour before returning her to her hotel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HILARY AND THE TROUBLEMAKERS by Kathleen Leverich
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 26, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Hilary's highly imaginative alibis are so real to her that- -unlike her family and her teacher—she quite believes in them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHORT STORIES OF ERNEST HEMINGWAY by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 2017

"Essential for students of modern literature, offering insight into the mind and methods of one of the greatest practitioners of the story form."
A gathering of some of Papa's best—and not so best—short fiction, the genre for which he first became known and is perhaps most honored today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HILARY RODHAM CLINTON by Kathleen Krull
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"No matter—she was propelling her way into history.' (author's notes, sources) (Picture book/biography. 4-8)"
When young Hillary Rodham's hopes of joining NASA as an astronaut were dashed because she was a girl, she didn't stop dreaming or doing, all the way (almost) to the top. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FAIRY CALLED HILARY by Linda Leopold Strauss
Released: April 15, 1999

"In her wonderful frolic, Strauss mingles ordinary events and enchantment with ease; the fun is complemented by charmingly droll black-and-white drawings. (Fiction. 7-11)"
A very funny little book about a fairy and the family she elects to live with after they confess they believe in her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMLAND by Hilary Hemingway
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Obviously a far cry from Papa Hemingway's realism, Dreamland is spotty SF that takes an occasional, if unintentional, satirical swipe at space-age angst. (Author tour)"
Anyone who still believes that visitors from outer space are little wrinkled green men with weaving antennae are in for some surprises in this novel by Hemingway (niece of Ernest) and her husband, Lindsay. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMCHILD by Hilary Hemingway
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 16, 1998

"Fun, but unlike tales by abduction specialist Budd Hopkins, less than convincing."
Borrowing a title from Dennis Potter, Hemingway (niece of Ernest) and her husband Lindsay continue a tale begun with Dreamland (1995), wherein Annie Katz seemingly lost her four-month foetus when it was abducted from her body by aliens but later returned so she could carry it to term. Read full book review >