Search Results: Hilary Liftin


BOOK REVIEW

MOVIE STAR BY LIZZIE PEPPER by Hilary Liftin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 21, 2015

"Dishy Hollywood fiction at its finest from an author who traffics in the truth behind tabloid headlines."
This irresistible debut novel from an accomplished celebrity-memoir ghostwriter reads like a behind-the-scenes look at the marriage of a certain former Hollywood it couple. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORMAL by Magdalena Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 14, 2020

"Funny, compassionate, and thoughtful. (Memoir. 10-14)"
Nathaniel Newman and his mother, Magda, recount how Nathaniel's Treacher Collins syndrome has affected their family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: May 18, 1999

DEAR EXILEThe True Story of Two Friends Separated (for a Year) by an OceanLiftin, Hilary & Kate Montgomery Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: Jan. 7, 1973

This is a fine collection of 20th century Third World stories about women, most of which were written by men, which is at least a partial clue to the status of the ladies in these countries. Nearly all of them are bound by the traditions of their cultures: arranged (often child) marriages with anyone from eunuchs to wife-beaters to drunkards, a double standard that kills or exiles women who have sex with someone other than their husbands, suicide their one escape. The only women who even begin to move out of this deadening circle are those who seek education abroad or, conversely, take to the hills in guerrilla warfare, though even the latter fight more against strictly political oppression (e.g. against the U.S. troops in Vietnam) than sexism itself. With its glimpses into the customs of the kind of small villages Americans prefer to bomb than visit, this is a fascinating collection, oddly reassuring for what it shows, at least by contrast, about conditions in our own, surprisingly liberated, country. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: Oct. 25, 1945

The day to day account of a 29 year old glider pilot for the British, (a German who escaped to England after imprisonment for anti-Nazi opinions) of the first flight to Holland, which in simple, unheroic manner gives a telling picture of war on a concentrated sl, as the airborne operation is not successful, the men can only present a makeshift defense, backed with vigilant patrol and the ability to do the right things automatically. September 17 to 24, 1944 is the time, the objective was the bridge at Arnhem — and retreat, almost hopeless, was the result. An effective, unaccented account. Read full book review >