Search Results: "Holger Herwig"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Students of WWII, especially of its diplomatic and geopolitical aspects, will want to have a look."
Fighting fascism is hard. Fighting it while arguing who's in charge of the struggle only makes things harder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 8, 2009

"Like the war itself, a tough slog, but Herwig's long-overdue revision of the history of the Marne will interest WWI enthusiasts."
An exhaustively documented account of the Battle of the Marne, the outcome of which would define the course of World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Berucson and Herwig add little to the big picture here, but the story of the Bismarck, the technical details of naval warfare, and the biographies of the major participants remain endlessly fascinating. (21 illustrations, 3 maps)"
A retelling of the best news the British had apart from Pearl Harbor in the dismal year of 1941: the sinking of the fearsome German battleship Bismarck. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCARS OF INDEPENDENCE by Holger Hoock
NON-FICTION
Released: May 9, 2017

"An accomplished, powerful presentation of the American Revolution as it was, rather than as we might wish to remember it."
The American Revolution was no festive musical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND ITS GERMANIC PEOPLES by Herwig Wolfram
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Despite himself, Wolfram establishes that the Germanic nations arose from the darkness of prehistory to transform the great culture of Rome and in so doing set the stage for the emergence not only of Christendom, but also ultimately of Germany and the other nation-states of Europe."
In a comprehensive reinterpretation of the role of barbaric tribes in Roman history, Wolfram (History/Univ. of Vienna) seeks to ``trace the beginnings of a history of the Germans'' by examining in depth the role of the Germanic tribes in the development, transformation, and collapse of the Roman Empire. Read full book review >