Search Results: "Howard Gordon"


BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HAWKS by Todd McCarthy
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"It portrays in wide-screen format a life until now presented only in sketches. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
A pleasingly thorough, if not critically groundbreaking, retrospective of the works and life of Hollywood's most versatile (and, to some cineasts, best) director. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GORDON PARKS by Ann Parr
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 2006

"A substandard, message-driven production, of limited value to libraries. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)"
Based on an interview with Parks, now in his 90s, and built on his mother's childhood challenge, "What a white boy can do, you can too—and no excuses," Parr's profile briefly traces the photographer/writer/filmmaker's career from early struggles in Minnesota to his memoir for adults, Hungry Heart (2005). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"The research seems sound enough, but one-dimensional characters and consistently clumsy prose doom this first of a series. There may be a story worth telling here, but the grandson of Sinclair Lewis hasn't found it yet."
Chunky, clunky debut novel about a one-time slave who fights Confederates, injustice, ignorance, racism, Native Americans, whatever—all superheroically. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD ZINN by Martin Duberman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Recommended for readers already smitten with Zinn."
A star-struck biography of the prominent historian and activist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HUGHES by Charles Higham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"Undeniably a hypnotic portrait of a great American monster."
An outing of the billionaire closet bisexual by Higham, whose bios include lives of Cary Grant, Brando, Orson Welles, the Duchess of Windsor, and L.B. Mayer, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GORDON PARKS by Carole Boston Weatherford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"Parks' photography gave a powerful and memorable face to racism in America; this book gives him to young readers. (afterword, author's note, photographs) (Picture book/biography. 6-8)"
He aimed his camera lens at fashion models and at struggling African-American workers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLORENCE GORDON by Brian Morton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Always a pleasure to read for his well-drawn characters, quiet insight and dialogue that crackles with wit, Morton here raises his own bar in all three areas. He also joins a sadly small club of male writers who have created memorable heroines."
Unexpected celebrity and long-absent family members distract a heroically cantankerous 1960s-era activist in the summer of 2009 as she reluctantly confronts the challenges of age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 14, 2011

"The definitive word on a loved, loathed, maddeningly complex broadcasting legend."
You could make a case that Howard Cosell (1918-1995) was the single most important sports broadcaster ever. You would be right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD WALLACE, P.I. by Casey Lyall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Likely to see sequels; Howard and Ivy deserve them. (Mystery. 8-11)"
Grantleyville Middle School lowlifes beware: shamus Howard Wallace is on the case! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WAS HOWARD HUGHES by Steven Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 2003

"A darkly diverting, slightly cautionary tale about a barmy billionaire and his batty biographer."
First-novelist Carter hits the scene with a madly inventive mock bio. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD THURMAN’S GREAT HOPE by Kai Jackson Issa
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"The author ends with Thurman's college graduation and never discusses his significance as a strong advocate of nonviolence—but readers may be tempted by the text's very spareness to seek out more information about him and his legacy. (Picture book/biography. 7-9)"
Though rigidly purposeful, this important profile introduces young readers to a Civil Rights Movement figure who should be better known. Read full book review >