Search Results: "Howard Jacobson"


BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HAWKS by Todd McCarthy
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"It portrays in wide-screen format a life until now presented only in sketches. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
A pleasingly thorough, if not critically groundbreaking, retrospective of the works and life of Hollywood's most versatile (and, to some cineasts, best) director. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD ZINN by Martin Duberman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Recommended for readers already smitten with Zinn."
A star-struck biography of the prominent historian and activist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HUGHES by Charles Higham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"Undeniably a hypnotic portrait of a great American monster."
An outing of the billionaire closet bisexual by Higham, whose bios include lives of Cary Grant, Brando, Orson Welles, the Duchess of Windsor, and L.B. Mayer, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J by Howard Jacobson
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A pleasure, as reading Jacobson always is—though much different from what we've come to expect, which is not at all a bad thing."
Jacobson (The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.), Britain's answer to Philip Roth, returns with an enigmatic tale of the near future.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO MORE MR. NICE GUY by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A lovely, lively novel for all its sometimes bitter view of the war between the sexes; impeccably written, and without a false note."
Man Booker Prize winner Jacobson (The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.) delivers a cross-the-pond rejoinder to Philip Roth in this entertaining, sexually laden picaresque. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 1, 2012

"Rich and flavorful—best ingested in small amounts so the savory pleasures linger."
The 2010 winner of the Man Booker Prize serves up selections from his columns at the Independent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHYLOCK IS MY NAME by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"The book is also full of the facile asides and riffs for which Jacobson has been praised and spanked—comic patter that pales amid the fine, thoughtful talk when his two heroes hold forth in this uneven effort."
A novelization of The Merchant of Venice set in contemporary England touches on foreskins, art collectors, athletes, and troublesome daughters.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE LAND OF OZ by Howard Jacobson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 10, 2013

"Witty, at times self-deprecating, and always shrewdly observant, Jacobson offers a wry, revealing portrait of a land and its people."
A sharp-eyed British traveler recalls his greatest adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIGHTY WALZER by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 29, 2011

"A delight from start to finish, and a note-perfect evocation of the gray 1950s."
An entertaining Jewish picaresque novel, following on Jacobson's Man Booker Prize-winning The Finkler Question (2010). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FINKLER QUESTION by Howard Jacobson
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

"At turns a romp and a disquisition worthy of Maimonides; elegantly written throughout, and with plenty of punchlines too."
Elegiac—but also humorous—meditation on life's big questions: life, death, the nature of justice, whether to sleep with a German. The book won the 2010 Man Booker Prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VERY MODEL OF A MAN by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 1994

"Jacobson looks into faith and sees only dark corners."
A smug novel that aspires to rip the lid off religious convention and conviction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROOTS SCHMOOTS by Howard Jacobson
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 21, 1994

"Despite some nice miniatures, a snide, rather pointless, lazy book."
In his fiction (Redback, 1987; Peeping Tom, 1985, etc.) and now with this travelogue/sociologue/personalogue about his semi-Jewishness, Jacobson seems fated never quite to cast off the perception of him as a Philip Roth wannabe perpetually one step behind (both in talent and intellectual plasticity) his American master. Read full book review >