Search Results: "Hugh Howard"


BOOK REVIEW

RED HUGH by Deborah Lisson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"It's an adventuresome tale, but the author uses it to promote an ugly agenda. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Limey-haters worldwide will crow at this history-based tale of Irish defiance during the reign of that "howling old hag," that "harridan," that "old red hag of a queen," Elizabeth I. Kidnapped by deceitful British, young Hugh spends four long years as a prisoner in Dublin Castle, hearing news of one atrocity after another, beaten and scorned but triumphing in every verbal encounter with his prejudiced, stupid captors, all of whom dress in ridiculous clothes and practice a colorless, denatured religion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD ZINN by Martin Duberman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Recommended for readers already smitten with Zinn."
A star-struck biography of the prominent historian and activist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HUGHES by Charles Higham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"Undeniably a hypnotic portrait of a great American monster."
An outing of the billionaire closet bisexual by Higham, whose bios include lives of Cary Grant, Brando, Orson Welles, the Duchess of Windsor, and L.B. Mayer, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HAWKS by Todd McCarthy
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"It portrays in wide-screen format a life until now presented only in sketches. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
A pleasingly thorough, if not critically groundbreaking, retrospective of the works and life of Hollywood's most versatile (and, to some cineasts, best) director. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 14, 2011

"The definitive word on a loved, loathed, maddeningly complex broadcasting legend."
You could make a case that Howard Cosell (1918-1995) was the single most important sports broadcaster ever. You would be right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"A novel, ingeniously executed approach to the inspiring man whose dollar-bill likeness is arguably the most reproduced painted image in history."
Art historian Howard (Dr. Kimball and Mr. Jefferson, 2006, etc.) persuasively asserts the centrality of the first president to the first flowering of American painting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 8, 2001

"Equally fascinating for its exploration of both the physical complexities of housebuilding and the theory and history that lie behind the ways homes are made."
An absorbing account of amateur builder Howard's construction of his family home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARCHITECTURE'S ODD COUPLE by Hugh Howard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"New light is shed on both architects in this absorbing, well-organized, delightfully told story."
An in-depth portrait of two "grand men of American architecture." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"The star here is Kimball, who upstages even Jefferson, emerging as a towering figure in American architecture and architectural scholarship."
Interwoven stories of America's earliest architects and prodigious scholar Dr. Fiske Kimball (1888-1955), who devoted his career to discovering, restoring and preserving their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2012

"An entertaining portrait of the era's first couple and the social life of the young nation's elite."
Numerous books have cast almost too much light on the "unknown" War of 1812, so historian Howard (The Painter's Chair: George Washington and the Making of American Art, 2009, etc.) take a different tack, writing largely from the point of view of President Madison and Dolley, the nation's most popular first lady before Eleanor Roosevelt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

"An informative and accessible guide to the current status of preservation by someone who celebrates style and craftsmanship."
As much a book about old buildings as some of the men involved in saving them, here's a thoughtful journey through contemporary cultural conservation. Read full book review >