Search Results: "Hugh McMahon"


BOOK REVIEW

RED HUGH by Deborah Lisson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"It's an adventuresome tale, but the author uses it to promote an ugly agenda. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Limey-haters worldwide will crow at this history-based tale of Irish defiance during the reign of that "howling old hag," that "harridan," that "old red hag of a queen," Elizabeth I. Kidnapped by deceitful British, young Hugh spends four long years as a prisoner in Dublin Castle, hearing news of one atrocity after another, beaten and scorned but triumphing in every verbal encounter with his prejudiced, stupid captors, all of whom dress in ridiculous clothes and practice a colorless, denatured religion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUGH CAN DO by Jennifer Armstrong
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An attractive book that will be fun to share aloud. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In an original tale with a folkloric lilt, a persistent orphan in need of a toll for the bridge to what he hopes will be good fortune goes on an ``Old Woman and Her Pig''-style quest: the Toll Man requests a loaf of bread; the baker asks Hugh to get his grain ground; the miller needs his apron mended; and so forth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2012

"Good storytelling matched with appropriate historical skepticism—a useful model for examining other 10-gallon yarns of westward expansion."
An inadvertent American archetype comes in for thoughtful consideration in the hands of Coleman (History/Notre Dame Univ.; Vicious: Wolves and Men in America, 2004). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLY AND HUGH by Anthony Browne
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A treat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The appealing Willy the Wimp (1984) is back, still a left- out little chimp in a world of sturdy gorillas—at least until he literally runs into huge Hugh. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURSE OF ADDY McMAHON by Katie Davis
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"A well-crafted view of a child's inner struggles and emotional growth. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Addy believes her Grandmother when she claims the "family curse" has been lurking for several generations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

L.A. MENTAL by Neil McMahon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"The plot reads as if dashed off to meet a deadline, but the book is somewhat redeemed by decent writing."
Seasoned mystery writer McMahon (Dead Silver, 2008, etc.) steps into a new genre with his first thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRIMSON ROOMS by Katharine McMahon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"A fine, compassionate, elegiac combination of human and courtroom drama—the author's best yet."
Another inventive, nuanced historical novel from McMahon (The Rose of Sebastopol, 2009, etc.), again focused on a progressive female protagonist constrained by the expectations of her era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE OF SEBASTOPOL by Katharine McMahon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 5, 2009

"Marked by its passion and social commentary, this is a pleasingly unformulaic read, although its twin time frames and ending may not satisfy all readers."
An unusual and vivid historical novel tracks a feverish love triangle/mystery across the battlefields of the Crimean War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRA FOXGLOVE by Thomas McMahon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2004

"Reminiscent of the best of Walker Percy: a deeply funny, strange, moving account of middle-aged angst overcome by genius, sympathy, and profound naiveté."
A deceptively lighthearted fourth novel by the late cult favorite McMahon (1943-99; Loving Little Egypt, 1986, etc.) depicts a forlorn husband's tragicomic quest to reclaim his AWOL wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCE OF KNIVES by Donna McMahon
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A brisk, well-constructed swirl of murky plots and dark psychology, if rather heavy on the lesbian angle: a debut that, despite impressive ingredients, lacks warmth."
By the 22nd century, after climatic change and rising sea levels, the city of Vancouver is divided between prosperous but regressive and cliquish Guild territory and the island of Downtown, whose slums are inhabited by the Guildless, refugees from America, gangs, criminals, and the destitute. Read full book review >