Search Results: "Hugh Wilford"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Unlike Tim Weiner's brilliant Legacy of Ashes, whose litany of disastrous covert operations makes for painful reading, this superb account will provide CIA aficionados with some welcome comic relief."
By turns hilarious and horrifying, the story of the CIA's attempts to disseminate anticommunist propaganda through a variety of front organizations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 3, 2013

"A mostly insightful examination of these 'Mad Men on the Nile.'"
By turns admiring and critical play-by-play of CIA Arabists as they directed the Cold War's Middle East chessboard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOICES FROM A FAR COUNTRY by Hugh Carr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 10, 1996

"An enjoyable debut, though without the observations and originality of more commanding works of the genre."
With undeniable shadings of Roddy Doyle's Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, this Irish first novel offers certain charms in the end, despite a sluggish beginning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 12, 2005

"A solid work of history, cultural geography and reportage, opening a view onto a world too few in the West even know exists."
Once a fighter, always a fighter: or, never rule out the tenacity of a descendant of the Golden Horde. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILENT BATTLEFIELDS by Hugh Rosen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 2005

"A complex blend of memory, cultural identity, the ties that bind us and the ghosts that haunt us."
An elegiac tale of regret from both sides of a cataclysmic war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"The star here is Kimball, who upstages even Jefferson, emerging as a towering figure in American architecture and architectural scholarship."
Interwoven stories of America's earliest architects and prodigious scholar Dr. Fiske Kimball (1888-1955), who devoted his career to discovering, restoring and preserving their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK JONES by Hugh Kenner
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The other two are Greg Sarris's Mabel McKay: Weaving the Dream, profiling the Pomo basket weaver and medicine woman, and Yvonne Fern's Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation, a discussion with the creator of Star Trek."
Dr. Seuss created the Grinch, but it took Chuck Jones to make him move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1991

The Irish playwright Leonard (the Tony-winning Da; two memoirs, Home Before Night and Out After Dark) turns to fiction with a witty, glitteringly dramatic treatment of the by-now mythic love affair of Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-91), the Irish leader who fired the drive for Home Rule, and English-born Kitty O'Shea. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPPOSED TO DIE by Hugh Dutton
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 18, 2015

"Dutton's debut packs so many minor characters into his opening chapters that it's hard to connect to the hero, but her storytelling has grit and the sleuthing trio has nice chemistry."
Can't an innocent ex-con catch a break? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRIMINAL ELEMENT by Hugh Holton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Better than usual genre fare from an increasingly skilled writer."
Things are never dull in Holton's Chicago, and in his latest outing, things haven't gotten any simpler for series hero Police Commander Larry Cole (The Devil's Shadow, p. 363, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADE IN HERO: THE WAR FOR SOAP by Betty Hugh
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Poetic. Unforgettable. And in the company of Hemingway, Wilfred Owen, Ernst Junger, Curzio Malaparte and T.E. Lawrence."
An extraordinary find. Managing to be both archetypal and contemporary, this fierce, sour tale, written with an echo of the gorgeous austerity of the ancient Greeks, ranks with the finest of war-writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEETH by Hugh Gallagher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"Gallagher chews on more than he's bit off in this puerile bit of self-puffery. (Author tour)"
This first novel from a popular 'zine writer has youth-cult exploitation written all over it, and Gallagher lives down to a publisher's worst expectation: His portrait of the artist as a young punk journalist combines all the self-pity and self- aggrandizing one could expect in such a callow effort. Read full book review >