Search Results: "Ian Tattersall"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Wise words from a highly qualified observer of humanity past and present."
A refreshing appraisal of the state of the science of human origins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 27, 2012

"Keeping a critical eye on the evidence and a skeptical one on theories, Tattersall confirms his status among world anthropologists by delivering a superior popular explanation of human origins."
A veteran anthropologist writes a superb overview of how our species developed (a long process) and how we grew smart enough to dominate the planet (a short process in which evolution played little part). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 9, 2015

"An opinionated, authoritative, and delightfully provocative account of efforts to make sense of human fossil discoveries."
Despite his 2012 history of Homo sapiens, Masters of the Planet, Tattersall, curator emeritus in the anthropology division of the American Museum of Natural History, revisits the subject from another angle, with equally superb results.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 23, 1998

The latest entry into the who-are-we-and- where-did-we-come-from debate is from Tattersall (The Fossil Trail, 1995, etc.), the highly regarded fossil expert and curator of the department of anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"There are plenty of strong personal opinions here (Neanderthals were a dead-end species; human evolution has stalled for the foreseeable future), but they ring true. The whole production is as absorbing and literate as one would expect from Tattersall."
A collection of eight original essays that make up a primer on evolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA AND THE FAIRY PRINCESSES by Ian Falconer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"Not a whole lot of plot here, but panache aplenty. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In this latest, delightfully droll episode, readers find their precocious pig suffering from an identity crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA HELPS WITH CHRISTMAS by Ian Falconer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2007

"The overall effect has neither Christmas cheer nor the satisfying, saucy humor of previous Olivia adventures. (Picture book. 3-6)"

BOOK REVIEW

CAT & MOUSE by Ian Schoenherr
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"To be worried or teased'—before playtime becomes dinnertime. (Picture book. 2-4)"
"So I won't pull her tail / Nor drive her away, / But Kitty and I / Very gently will play…" The "I" in Schoenherr's free adaptation of three nursery rhymes is a sportive, mischievous mouse that Kitty pretends to ignore until making a quick feint to grab the wee beasty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA’S OPPOSITES by Ian Falconer
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2002

"Quite the opposite. (Board book. 2-4)"
She's up; she's down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA COUNTS by Ian Falconer
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2002

"This simple but satisfying work can serve as an introduction for younger preschoolers to the two longer Olivia stories, and Olivia's adoring fans of all ages will give three cheers for any new Olivia tale, long or short. (Board book. 2-4)"
You can count on Falconer (Olivia's Opposites, below, etc.) to keep adding droll, imaginative appearances for his precocious porcine protagonist, the inimitable Olivia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA FORMS A BAND by Ian Falconer
ANIMALS
Released: June 6, 2006

"So consummately consistent are Falconer's characterizations and so perceptive are Olivia's constant fans, that every deft facial nuance will be met with squeals of approval for the most popular pig in America—and her long-suffering mother. (Picture book. 4+)"
Falconer adds a new color for this fourth offering in readers' long-standing love affair with the inimitable Olivia—and she still rules. Read full book review >