Search Results: "Ian Thomson"


BOOK REVIEW

IAN FLEMING by Andrew Lycett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A solid scholarly biography with little to savor for general readers. Lycett's subject remains an aloof, disagreeable enigma."
An exhaustive and exhausting biography of Ian Fleming (1908-1964), the creator of secret agent James Bond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIRGIL THOMSON by Anthony Tommasini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"Tommasini had access to the relevant documents and made reasonable use of them, but his book lacks the qualities Thomson's own writings always had: wit, verve, and a sense of history. (photos, not seen)"
A generally informative biography of the influential American composer that suffers, paradoxically, from its author's intimacy with his subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRIMO LEVI by Ian Thomson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 12, 2003

"Readers may have trouble choosing between this and Carole Angier's The Double Bond (2002). Each has considerable merit, and admirers of Levi will want to know both."
A rich life of the enormously gifted but deeply troubled Italian Jewish writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEAD YARD by Ian Thomson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2011

"A broadly informative cultural investigation despite its inherently biased perspective."
A British journalist takes a probing, critical look at economic and moral decline in post-independence Jamaica. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S ABC by Ian Penney
ABC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Elegant and illuminating. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Each page of Penney's alphabet resembles a piece of stained glass, not in the precious sense, but in its composition and light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN IS SICK  by Pauline Oud
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 11, 2017

"Ian isn't well, and his book isn't so great either. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Some TLC and a play date help a sick little boy get better. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 15, 2010

"More appreciation than critique. Cabell's biggest achievement is an annotated guide to Rankin first editions and comprehensive cast lists and episode summaries of the TV series."
An analysis of much-lauded crime writer Ian Rankin's relationship with his iconoclastic detective John Rebus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S BOOK OF FAIRY TALES by Ian Penney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Some of the appeal will be wasted on American children, but travelers, even of the armchair variety, might give it a go. (Picture book/folklore. 7-9)"
The Billy-Goats-Gruff, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and more of the usual suspects play out their tales on some of Great Britain's historic sites and estates: Stowe, the Giant's Causeway, Kedleston in Derby, the ``Bear's Hut'' on the grounds of Killeston, the garden tower at Cornwall's Trelissick, and Chirk Castle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TYPEWRITER by Bill Thomson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"Words rule in this intriguing, impressive, imaginative, nearly wordless narrative drama. (Picturebook. 5-9)"
Three kids find an old typewriter, igniting spectacular surprises when they start playing with it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELOVED POISON by E.S. Thomson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2016

"A debut mystery chock full of mysterious doings, riveting historical detail, and so many horrifying anecdotes about the state of medicine in the mid-1800s that you can almost feel the evil miasma rising from the pages."
The coming demolition of St. Saviour's Infirmary in Victorian London marks a decisive chapter for a young woman who's lived her entire life there as a man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECRECY by Rupert Thomson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 2014

"Thomson succeeds on a number of levels here, for the novel works as a mystery, as a love story, as a historical novel and, more abstractly, as an exploration of aesthetic theory."
Thomson (Death of a Murderer, 2007, etc.) takes us to 17th-century Florence, which by definition seems to be full of corrupt politicians, unscrupulous clergy and aspiring artists—and this, of course, long after the Renaissance has ended. Read full book review >