Search Results: "Ian Tregillis"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LIBERATION by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A frighteningly frank and brutal consideration of slavery, post-slavery, and colonialism in metallic garb."
The thoughtful, blood-soaked conclusion to an alternate-history trilogy (The Rising, 2015, etc.) in which the Dutch rule Europe and the New World thanks to their control of Clakkers, mechanical servants fueled by clockwork and alchemy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING MORE THAN NIGHT by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2013

"Superlatives seem superfluous. Instead...wow. Just—wow."
New, independent fantasy from the author of the fine Milkweed Triptych (Necessary Evil, 2013, etc.)—and it's a doozy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RISING by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"Part 3 can't come too soon."
War overshadows this second volume of an alternate-world trilogy (The Mechanical, 2015) set a few hundred years after the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens blended clockwork and alchemy to create the robotic Clakkers.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NECESSARY EVIL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 30, 2013

"Darkly fascinating, flaws and all: A thoroughly satisfying conclusion to an imaginative tour de force."
Independently intelligible final installment—Tregillis provides an ingenious summary while getting things under way—of the Milkweed Triptych (The Coldest War, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MECHANICAL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"Not quite yet peak Tregillis, but his fans—and other readers with an interest in dark, intelligent fantasy—will find much to admire here."
First of a new fantasy trilogy from the author of the splendid Something More Than Night (2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLDEST WAR by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 2012

"Grim indeed, yet eloquent and utterly compelling."
Independently intelligible sequel to the dark fantasy Bitter Seeds (2010), something like a cross between the devious, character-driven spy fiction of early John le Carré and the mad science fantasy of the X-Men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN FLEMING by Andrew Lycett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A solid scholarly biography with little to savor for general readers. Lycett's subject remains an aloof, disagreeable enigma."
An exhaustive and exhausting biography of Ian Fleming (1908-1964), the creator of secret agent James Bond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S ABC by Ian Penney
ABC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Elegant and illuminating. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Each page of Penney's alphabet resembles a piece of stained glass, not in the precious sense, but in its composition and light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN IS SICK  by Pauline Oud
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 11, 2017

"Ian isn't well, and his book isn't so great either. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Some TLC and a play date help a sick little boy get better. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 15, 2010

"More appreciation than critique. Cabell's biggest achievement is an annotated guide to Rankin first editions and comprehensive cast lists and episode summaries of the TV series."
An analysis of much-lauded crime writer Ian Rankin's relationship with his iconoclastic detective John Rebus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S BOOK OF FAIRY TALES by Ian Penney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Some of the appeal will be wasted on American children, but travelers, even of the armchair variety, might give it a go. (Picture book/folklore. 7-9)"
The Billy-Goats-Gruff, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and more of the usual suspects play out their tales on some of Great Britain's historic sites and estates: Stowe, the Giant's Causeway, Kedleston in Derby, the ``Bear's Hut'' on the grounds of Killeston, the garden tower at Cornwall's Trelissick, and Chirk Castle. Read full book review >