Search Results: "Ian Tregillis"


BOOK REVIEW

THE COLDEST WAR by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 2012

"Grim indeed, yet eloquent and utterly compelling."
Independently intelligible sequel to the dark fantasy Bitter Seeds (2010), something like a cross between the devious, character-driven spy fiction of early John le Carré and the mad science fantasy of the X-Men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MECHANICAL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"Not quite yet peak Tregillis, but his fans—and other readers with an interest in dark, intelligent fantasy—will find much to admire here."
First of a new fantasy trilogy from the author of the splendid Something More Than Night (2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIBERATION by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A frighteningly frank and brutal consideration of slavery, post-slavery, and colonialism in metallic garb."
The thoughtful, blood-soaked conclusion to an alternate-history trilogy (The Rising, 2015, etc.) in which the Dutch rule Europe and the New World thanks to their control of Clakkers, mechanical servants fueled by clockwork and alchemy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING MORE THAN NIGHT by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2013

"Superlatives seem superfluous. Instead...wow. Just—wow."
New, independent fantasy from the author of the fine Milkweed Triptych (Necessary Evil, 2013, etc.)—and it's a doozy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NECESSARY EVIL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 30, 2013

"Darkly fascinating, flaws and all: A thoroughly satisfying conclusion to an imaginative tour de force."
Independently intelligible final installment—Tregillis provides an ingenious summary while getting things under way—of the Milkweed Triptych (The Coldest War, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RISING by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"Part 3 can't come too soon."
War overshadows this second volume of an alternate-world trilogy (The Mechanical, 2015) set a few hundred years after the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens blended clockwork and alchemy to create the robotic Clakkers.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUE STORY OF TRAPPER JACK’S LEFT BIG TOE by Ian Wallace
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"A great story, so well paced even the author's note brings the fluid text to a smooth and satisfying end. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When Josh learns from his best friend that Trapper John's big toe is in a tobacco tin behind the Sourdough Saloon counter, he's skeptical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S ABC by Ian Penney
ABC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Elegant and illuminating. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Each page of Penney's alphabet resembles a piece of stained glass, not in the precious sense, but in its composition and light. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

QUEERIES
by Karen Schechner, Vice President of Kirkus Indie, Kirkus Reviews

Set in the early 1980s, London Skin & Bones: The Finsbury Park Stories celebrates the residents of the Finsbury Park neighborhood in northern London. Ian Young’s collection of stories reveals a generous community of all sorts—launderettes, working-class gay lads, punks, stoners, stamp collectors, scavengers, revolutionaries in exile, and criminals. Our reviewer said Young creates “an impressive and tactile sense of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET HISTORY OF TOM TRUEHEART by Ian Beck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"For most readers, however, this is likely too much talk and not enough action. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Though long, predictable and open-ended, Beck's fantasy may still find a willing audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMMY AND THE DINOSAURS by Ian Whybrow
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"8216;' This is a beautiful, cheering story full of offbeat charm. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The utterly winsome Sammy (and his crabby, TV-narcotized sister) is featured in a fine little story from Whybrow (The Snow King, p. 806, etc.) about the pleasures of friends who happen to be of a different species. Read full book review >