Search Results: "Ian Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

NOSTRADAMUS by Ian Wilson
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 18, 2003

"Generally fair-minded treatment of a character with an enduring hold on the popular imagination."
A new biography of the famous French astrologer, based on many original sources. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1991

"Admirable for its doggedness, scholarship, and sensitive handling of a real hot-potato."
British journalist Wilson has built a career around the Turin shroud (The Mysterious Shroud, 1986) and other religious arcana (The After-Death Experience, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1998

"The book is unlikely to persuade the skeptics Wilson is clearly trying to reach, but never fear; he will almost certainly write more on the subject. (illustrations)"
A stubborn but unconvincing apologia for the author's persistent belief that the Shroud of Turin is the actual burial shroud of Jesus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AFTER DEATH EXPERIENCE by Ian Wilson
Released: Feb. 21, 1989

Judicious survey of current beliefs about survival after death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 5, 1994

"Despite unearthing some controversial historical possibilities, Wilson ultimately displays as much wishful thinking in making Shakespeare a crypto-Catholic as others have in attributing his plays to Francis Bacon. (54 b&w photos, not seen; 14 figures)"
In his search for the historical Bard of Avon, religious historian Wilson (Jesus: The Evidence, 1991) penetrates the Elizabethan stage's shadow world with some success but tendentiously turns Shakespeare into a cypher for crypto-Catholic theories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 12, 2002

"A bold revision of ancient history that is well worth reading, even if its conclusions sometimes overshoot the evidence."
A blend of archaeological fact and anthropological speculation by Australian historian Wilson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIA THE SPY by Ian Falconer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"Once die-hard fans spy this, they'll make a grab for it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
That irrepressible porker is back. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T SPILL THE BEANS! by Ian Schoenherr
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2010

"Great for storytimes on secrets or as a special birthday gift. (Picture book. 1-4)"
"What's THAT, Bear? / Don't spill the beans! / Don't let it slip! / Don't give it away! / Just button your lip!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURIOSITY CABINET by Ian Wallace
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Graphite wizardry notwithstanding, a showcase or keepsake with more personal than general meaning. (introduction) (Picture book. 6-8)"
In a series of atmospheric tableaux, the distinguished Canadian author/illustrator portrays mementos and images from visits to each province and territory over his long career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUE STORY OF TRAPPER JACK’S LEFT BIG TOE by Ian Wallace
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"A great story, so well paced even the author's note brings the fluid text to a smooth and satisfying end. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When Josh learns from his best friend that Trapper John's big toe is in a tobacco tin behind the Sourdough Saloon counter, he's skeptical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IAN PENNEY'S ABC by Ian Penney
ABC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Elegant and illuminating. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Each page of Penney's alphabet resembles a piece of stained glass, not in the precious sense, but in its composition and light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIP & SQUEAK by Ian Schoenherr
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Rest assured: This soon-to-be popular offering ends on a happy—albeit surprising—note. (Picture book. 1-4)"
This appealing picture book profiles the winter journey of mice Pip and Squeak, as they go from their home in a mailbox through a rural landscape buried under snow, to the birthday celebration of their forest friend, Gus. Read full book review >