Search Results: "Ira Berlin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 25, 2010

"An insightful meditation on the physical and cultural journeys of African-Americans in the United States."
A succinct study of how the migrations of African Americans, from the slavery era to the present, affected the development of black culture in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAVERY IN NEW YORK by Ira Berlin
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A fine work of scholarship, offering a view of the metropolis that few today know."
New York: multiethnic, liberal, progressive—and a nexus of slavery in North America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 1998

"A cogently argued, well-researched narrative that points to the complex nature of American slavery, the falsity of many of our stereotypes, and the unique world wrought by the slaves themselves. (4 illustrations, 4 maps)"
In a real contribution to the literature of American slavery, Berlin (History/Univ. of Maryland, College Park; co-editor, Families and Freedom, 1997) sketches the complex evolution of that institution in the American colonies and the early US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

Harrowing first-person accounts—not only on the printed page but in audiotapes of original interviews conducted decades ago—of American slavery and its aftermath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 11, 1997

"A revealing history about the precarious state of black families during and after the Civil War. (36 b&w illustrations)"
Berlin and Rowland, editors of the prize-winning collection Free at Last, have come up with another moving documentary history, this one focusing on black family life in the Civil War era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"Penetrating work from the old fox of liberalism, as brilliant in rethinking the past as in recreating its thought."
More of a motley in scope than previous selections of his essays (The Crooked Timber of Humanity, 1991, etc.), this collection nonetheless displays Berlin's superb erudition and always stimulating insights. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEADLOCK by Adam Berlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 12, 2000

"Easy entertainment, from a still-imitative writer who may grow."
Berlin debuts with a deft but conventional tale of youth and anger, in a fictional house of toughness resting on a thin psychological foundation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 20, 1976

"The essays do not overlap, but are presented in stimulating contrast to and concert with one another."
Vico, the great philosopher and legal theorist of the Enlightenment who lived and died in obscurity, was among the first to sound the prevailing modern theme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A disappointingly superficial book about a number of fascinating subjects."
From his vantage point as host of NPR's popular radio show Science Friday, Flatow (They All Laughed...From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives, 1992, etc.) has acquired an impressive overview of current science. Unfortunately, this book fails to go beyond that overview. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECKLESS HOMICIDE by Ira Genberg
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 30, 1998

"Genberg writes a mean courtroom scene, and the supersonic pace will keep you turning pages, even if the story does depend a little too obviously on a series of bombshells that drop without warning from the stratosphere."
It's not easy to kill 120 people, especially if you never wanted to hurt a soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENTLEMEN OF SPACE by Ira Sher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2003

"A mysterious and gentle tale of loss conjured out of a more optimistic generation's shattered dreams."
What if a civilian were chosen to join a mission to the moon—and never came back? That's the basic premise in storywriter Sher's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAZING by Ira Sadoff
Released: Sept. 28, 1998

"Sadoff bothers at all, despite occasional bursts of lyric intensity, unmarred by facile politics."
A tenured radical (Colby College), embraces the '60s in the worst way: his blend of the personal and political always favors the former and trivializes the latter, especially when he becomes an imaginary witness to oppression, whether in Peron's Argentina or at a Selma lunch counter. Read full book review >