Search Results: "Ira Byock"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 27, 1997

"Often reminiscent of Michael Kearney's recent Mortally Wounded (p. 1029), which described that doctor's work with patients in an Irish hospice, this is another powerful argument in favor of the hospice movement and rejection of the Kevorkian approach."
A hospice doctor's wrenching stories of dying patients and their families, which dramatically illustrate his belief that the transition to death can be one of life's most meaningful experiences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 2012

"A persuasive argument for compassionate care."
A lucid explanation of palliative care and how it can help people die better. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEARTS & OTHER BODY PARTS by Ira Bloom
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 28, 2017

"A reworking of some classic stories that will entertain its readers even if it doesn't stay with them very long. (Fantasy. 13-18) "
Franklin N. "Norm" Stein, a scarred teen with acromegaly, starts at a new school where he meets a trio of sisters who are witches and helps them escape the thrall of two vampires. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE HOOP by Ira Berkow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 21, 1997

"Touching, inspiring, funny, and never self-indulgent, this is a sporting memoir that will connect with readers on many levels. ($35,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Using as a backdrop his lifelong devotion to playing basketball, Berkow, a respected New York Times sportswriter, shares his perspectives on life, death, sickness, health, and, of course, the quest for the perfect drive to the hoop. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WEDDING SONG by Ira Eisenstadt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A swing and a miss."
An aging baseball player struggles with life off the field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2013

"Some will quarrel with aspects of Katznelson's analysis, few with his widely allusive, elegant prose."
A wholly new approach to the New Deal takes history we thought we knew and makes it even richer and more complex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SINGER by Ira Sher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 23, 2009

"Elliptical, unsettling and strangely fascinating."
A New Jersey gallery owner accompanies a traveling salesman on an impressionistic, campy circumnavigation of the South in Sher's follow-up to Gentlemen of Space (2003). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEBASEMENTS OF BROOKLYN by Ira Gold
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 30, 2016

"Fun stuff, this oddball mating of The Godfather and The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight."
In Gold's debut, small-time Brooklyn hood Howard "Windows" Fenster sells weed and collects vigorish for capo Vinnie Five-Five Spoleto, but Howard's passion is the Penguin Classics library he inherited from his mob accountant father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 2005

"Katznelson also deepens our understanding of the modern civil rights movement, which begins in the 1930s, not the 1960s: a thoughtful account for readers with an interest in that history."
A searching study of institutional inequality, much of it wrought, then as now, by the South. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOING PUBLIC by Ira Wood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 1991

"But the characters are quirky and mostly lovable, and the moral underpinnings as wholesome as apple pie, making this a sweet bet of a love story for the Reader's Digest crowd."
The sensibility behind this comic novel by the author of The Kitchen Man (1985) is all It's a Wonderful Life, but updated to account for today's divorce rate, sexual liberation, compulsive career grubbing, and good kids who nonetheless pierce each ear five times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 13, 2010

"A useful primer for policy wonks and medical practitioners."
Despite manifest shortcomings, the American health-care system has come a long way over the past 250 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAZING by Ira Sadoff
Released: Sept. 28, 1998

"Sadoff bothers at all, despite occasional bursts of lyric intensity, unmarred by facile politics."
A tenured radical (Colby College), embraces the '60s in the worst way: his blend of the personal and political always favors the former and trivializes the latter, especially when he becomes an imaginary witness to oppression, whether in Peron's Argentina or at a Selma lunch counter. Read full book review >