Search Results: "Ira Kalina"


BOOK REVIEW

FINAL SHOT by Ira Kalina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2013

"A fast-paced, if occasionally implausible, mystery buoyed by a likable hero."
In Kalina's debut mystery, the host of a popular radio program races against time to unravel his family's secrets and bring a notorious Nazi war criminal to justice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID MAMET by Ira Nadel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"A trifle repetitious, but a sympathetic, scholarly and often penetrating examination of an American original."
The private life of prolific playwright, screenwriter, director, novelist and essayist Mamet remains private in a biography focused on his work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUCKER'S PEOPLE by Ira Wolfert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

statement page Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW KINGS OF NONFICTION by Ira Glass
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 2, 2007

"A journalistic mixtape for the ages."
A wholly satisfying greatest-hits collection of nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU'RE MARRIED TO HER? by Ira Wood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Saucy, sexy stories of a young writer's life."
A slim yet raucous romp through a novelist's life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMUEL ADAMS by Ira Stoll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 11, 2008

"Justly returns our attention to Adams—though liberal readers will prefer Mark Puls's 2006 biography, which emphasizes his role as a rabble-rousing man of the common people."
Neocon view of the least-known Founding Father, arguing that his religious beliefs fueled his revolutionary ardor and, in today's more secular America, have denied him his due from historians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 27, 1997

"Often reminiscent of Michael Kearney's recent Mortally Wounded (p. 1029), which described that doctor's work with patients in an Irish hospice, this is another powerful argument in favor of the hospice movement and rejection of the Kevorkian approach."
A hospice doctor's wrenching stories of dying patients and their families, which dramatically illustrate his belief that the transition to death can be one of life's most meaningful experiences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 2012

"A work of broad, archival and anecdotal research by a writer with a good grasp of the messy era and times."
From a Washington insider, a scrambled but edifying examination of the last four years of the Senate's "era of greatness"—1977 to 1980. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEBASEMENTS OF BROOKLYN by Ira Gold
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 30, 2016

"Fun stuff, this oddball mating of The Godfather and The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight."
In Gold's debut, small-time Brooklyn hood Howard "Windows" Fenster sells weed and collects vigorish for capo Vinnie Five-Five Spoleto, but Howard's passion is the Penguin Classics library he inherited from his mob accountant father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 13, 2010

"A useful primer for policy wonks and medical practitioners."
Despite manifest shortcomings, the American health-care system has come a long way over the past 250 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOING PUBLIC by Ira Wood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 1991

"But the characters are quirky and mostly lovable, and the moral underpinnings as wholesome as apple pie, making this a sweet bet of a love story for the Reader's Digest crowd."
The sensibility behind this comic novel by the author of The Kitchen Man (1985) is all It's a Wonderful Life, but updated to account for today's divorce rate, sexual liberation, compulsive career grubbing, and good kids who nonetheless pierce each ear five times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 2005

"Katznelson also deepens our understanding of the modern civil rights movement, which begins in the 1930s, not the 1960s: a thoughtful account for readers with an interest in that history."
A searching study of institutional inequality, much of it wrought, then as now, by the South. Read full book review >