Search Results: "Ira Katznelson"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 2005

"Katznelson also deepens our understanding of the modern civil rights movement, which begins in the 1930s, not the 1960s: a thoughtful account for readers with an interest in that history."
A searching study of institutional inequality, much of it wrought, then as now, by the South. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2013

"Some will quarrel with aspects of Katznelson's analysis, few with his widely allusive, elegant prose."
A wholly new approach to the New Deal takes history we thought we knew and makes it even richer and more complex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEARTS & OTHER BODY PARTS by Ira Bloom
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 28, 2017

"A reworking of some classic stories that will entertain its readers even if it doesn't stay with them very long. (Fantasy. 13-18) "
Franklin N. "Norm" Stein, a scarred teen with acromegaly, starts at a new school where he meets a trio of sisters who are witches and helps them escape the thrall of two vampires. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WEDDING SONG by Ira Eisenstadt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A swing and a miss."
An aging baseball player struggles with life off the field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE HOOP by Ira Berkow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 21, 1997

"Touching, inspiring, funny, and never self-indulgent, this is a sporting memoir that will connect with readers on many levels. ($35,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Using as a backdrop his lifelong devotion to playing basketball, Berkow, a respected New York Times sportswriter, shares his perspectives on life, death, sickness, health, and, of course, the quest for the perfect drive to the hoop. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAZING by Ira Sadoff
Released: Sept. 28, 1998

"Sadoff bothers at all, despite occasional bursts of lyric intensity, unmarred by facile politics."
A tenured radical (Colby College), embraces the '60s in the worst way: his blend of the personal and political always favors the former and trivializes the latter, especially when he becomes an imaginary witness to oppression, whether in Peron's Argentina or at a Selma lunch counter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECKLESS HOMICIDE by Ira Genberg
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 30, 1998

"Genberg writes a mean courtroom scene, and the supersonic pace will keep you turning pages, even if the story does depend a little too obviously on a series of bombshells that drop without warning from the stratosphere."
It's not easy to kill 120 people, especially if you never wanted to hurt a soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A disappointingly superficial book about a number of fascinating subjects."
From his vantage point as host of NPR's popular radio show Science Friday, Flatow (They All Laughed...From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives, 1992, etc.) has acquired an impressive overview of current science. Unfortunately, this book fails to go beyond that overview. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENTLEMEN OF SPACE by Ira Sher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2003

"A mysterious and gentle tale of loss conjured out of a more optimistic generation's shattered dreams."
What if a civilian were chosen to join a mission to the moon—and never came back? That's the basic premise in storywriter Sher's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 1998

"A cogently argued, well-researched narrative that points to the complex nature of American slavery, the falsity of many of our stereotypes, and the unique world wrought by the slaves themselves. (4 illustrations, 4 maps)"
In a real contribution to the literature of American slavery, Berlin (History/Univ. of Maryland, College Park; co-editor, Families and Freedom, 1997) sketches the complex evolution of that institution in the American colonies and the early US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOODPRINTS by Paula Ayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2015

"Regardless of its off-putting look, this effort is worthy of a broad audience. (Nonfiction. 10-18)"
Will teenagers willingly read an entertaining and brightly illustrated book about food, or will this effort reach only those who are writing reports? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 1994

"You have to feel sorry for the few excellent writers whose work is sandwiched in among the generally lurid entries: No one would seek them out based on their presence in this collection."
Sexually explicit writing is commonplace enough these days so that it's difficult to shock a sophisticated reader—but most authors here manage to find a way. ``What is central here is sex's relationship to death,'' the editors (who are collaborating on Serpent's Tail/High Risk Books) tell us in a brief preface. Read full book review >