Search Results: "Ira Stoll"


BOOK REVIEW

SAMUEL ADAMS by Ira Stoll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 11, 2008

"Justly returns our attention to Adams—though liberal readers will prefer Mark Puls's 2006 biography, which emphasizes his role as a rabble-rousing man of the common people."
Neocon view of the least-known Founding Father, arguing that his religious beliefs fueled his revolutionary ardor and, in today's more secular America, have denied him his due from historians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JFK, CONSERVATIVE by Ira Stoll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"A compelling textual study of how JFK became all things to all people."
Former New York Sun managing editor Stoll (Samuel Adams: A Life, 2008) makes a correction to the JFK record. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"If you can manage to get away from your computer screen long enough, read this valuable book."
A brilliant skeptic assails high-tech boosterism, attacking the trendy assumption that computers will profoundly improve our schools, libraries, and whole society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIGOBERTA MENCHU AND THE STORY OF ALL POOR GUATEMALANS by David Stoll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Stoll's book is not an attempt to debunk Rigoberta's story, but to serve as a warning that elevating one version of history to cult status inevitably silences a multitude of others."
An anthropologist's (Middlebury Coll.) critical reexamination of the phenomenon of Rigoberta Mench£, the Guatemalan peasant awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOT & JABBER AND THE BIG BUG MYSTERY by Ellen Stoll Walsh
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"Another excellent science mystery. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The dynamic mouse detective duo is at it again solving mysteries of the natural world for young children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A disappointingly superficial book about a number of fascinating subjects."
From his vantage point as host of NPR's popular radio show Science Friday, Flatow (They All Laughed...From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives, 1992, etc.) has acquired an impressive overview of current science. Unfortunately, this book fails to go beyond that overview. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECKLESS HOMICIDE by Ira Genberg
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 30, 1998

"Genberg writes a mean courtroom scene, and the supersonic pace will keep you turning pages, even if the story does depend a little too obviously on a series of bombshells that drop without warning from the stratosphere."
It's not easy to kill 120 people, especially if you never wanted to hurt a soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAZING by Ira Sadoff
Released: Sept. 28, 1998

"Sadoff bothers at all, despite occasional bursts of lyric intensity, unmarred by facile politics."
A tenured radical (Colby College), embraces the '60s in the worst way: his blend of the personal and political always favors the former and trivializes the latter, especially when he becomes an imaginary witness to oppression, whether in Peron's Argentina or at a Selma lunch counter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENTLEMEN OF SPACE by Ira Sher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2003

"A mysterious and gentle tale of loss conjured out of a more optimistic generation's shattered dreams."
What if a civilian were chosen to join a mission to the moon—and never came back? That's the basic premise in storywriter Sher's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 1998

"A cogently argued, well-researched narrative that points to the complex nature of American slavery, the falsity of many of our stereotypes, and the unique world wrought by the slaves themselves. (4 illustrations, 4 maps)"
In a real contribution to the literature of American slavery, Berlin (History/Univ. of Maryland, College Park; co-editor, Families and Freedom, 1997) sketches the complex evolution of that institution in the American colonies and the early US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"An inviting and edifying introduction to the improvers, who 'offered an opposite kind of change from the blaze and shift of nineteenth-century America.'"
An engaging examination of the early proponents of restorative husbandry—their origins, motivations, and how their ideas played out—from Yale historian Stoll. Read full book review >