Search Results: "Irene Trivas"


BOOK REVIEW

ANNIE...ANYA by Irene  Trivas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Trivas's pen-and-watercolor art nicely captures the city's ambiance and the children's lively activity. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Annie is five when her doctor parents take her to Moscow, where they are to work for a month. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POTLUCK by Anne Shelby
by Anne Shelby, illustrated by Irene Trivas
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 1991

"Delicious. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Setting their table for 31, Alpha and Betty call their friends in for an alphabetical feast: ``Ben brought bagels...Don did dumplings,'' and so on, with some nifty longer improvisations: ``Norman knew that oodles of noodles would be needed.'' The extra five? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAJAMA PARTY by Amy Hest
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 12, 1992

"Still, an attractive choice for young readers who like to read about girls like themselves. (Fiction. 5-9)"
For newly independent readers, a simple story (of four-and- a-half chapters) about three eight-year-old girls who live in the same apartment building; inspired by an older sister's 13th- birthday bash, they have their first sleepover. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT YET, YVETTE by Helen Ketteman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1992

Dad and little Yvette spend a companionable day cleaning the house, baking a cake, and preparing a birthday party for ``a cat doctor''—a day punctuated with Yvette's eager questions and Dad's patient responses until at last the guest of honor appears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK, WHITE, JUST RIGHT! by Marguerite W. Davol
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

The narrator enumerates qualities inherited from her parents—a face that's ``a little dark, a little light,'' somewhere between Mama's ``chestnut brown'' and Papa's fair skin; hair that's ``halfway in-between'' blond and black. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NANNIES FOR HIRE by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

Jenny Marks, one of the trio of eight-year-olds introduced in Pajama Party (1992), gets a baby sister. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEX FITZGERALD, TV STAR by Kathleen Krull
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1991

"An acceptable, if undistinguished, addition to young readers' collections. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Krull's second book about her irrepressible heroine takes up the excitement and disappointments of show business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE by Judy Blume
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1984

"And if anyone can remove the picture-book onus, it's Blume—so this back-to-back confrontation, illustrated in the same waggish spirit, should garner appreciative recognition."
How two jealous siblings feel about one another—starting with a third-grader's gripes about her first-grade brother, the Pain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODNIGHT, IRENE by Jan Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1993

"First of a series."
Back in 1955, O'Connor, a dogged reporter for the Las Piernas News Express, took up the case of Handless Hannah, an unidentified corpse he wrote about every year on the anniversary of her death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAR IRENE, by Jan Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"All Burke has done is take one of the hoariest clichÇs in the business—the letter-writing serial killer—and make it as fresh and chilling as a winter sunrise."
Somebody calling himself Thanatos, the lord of death, is writing letters to Las Piernas News Express reporter Irene Kelly (Sweet Dreams, Irene, p. 19, etc.), whom he calls Cassandra, obliquely prophesying a series of murders—and then making good on every prophecy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRENE AT LARGE by Carole Nelson Douglas
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1992

"Though the details about romance and ladies' garb are as arch as ever, the hindsighted period cameos and tangential intrigues are mercifully kept in abeyance as Holmes and Irene do their most charming (if, in Holmes's case, unwitting) work together."
With this third helping of corseted whimsy resurrecting Sherlock Holmes's old antagonist Irene Adler, Douglas (Good Night, Mr. Holmes; Good Morning, Irene) finally seems to be getting the hang of weaving a new mystery together with strands of Holmesiana that include the background of Col. Read full book review >