Search Results: "Isaac Bashevis Singer"


BOOK REVIEW

ENEMIES, A LOVE STORY by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 26, 1972

"Enemies appeared in 1966 in The Jewish Daily Forward."
It is a measure of Singer's strength that he is able to utilize what is essentially a familiar farcical situation — a man married to three wives — to scour the empty room of one human soul pursued by the echoes of real and terrible enemies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEANCE AND OTHER STORIES by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1968

"Exuberant humor, a somber regard for the sacred mysteries of human destinies, and magnificent story telling."
The fourth collection of stories by the spiritual heir to Sholom Aleichem, unique in their variety of approach and emotional scope. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WICKED CITY by Isaac Bashevis Singer
Released: March 15, 1972

"Altogether, this is no more outrageous a violation than, say, Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales, but Singer's uneasy blend of the mythic and the colloquial make it hard to swallow whole, even with all those grains of salt."
The cautionary chronicle of Lot, elaborately embroidered: his sojourn in Sodom, his nick-of-time escape aided by Abraham and the two angels, his wife's well-known transformation, and his subsequent stay in the desert with his two daughters who "found a cave. . . and lived like savages. . . in filth and sin." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIMPEL THE FOOL by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 21, 1957

"Various translators have kept the simplicity and native characteristics of the stories which, in their sly mirroring of human frailties and their compassion for man's attempts to be strong, have a universal note."
Twelve short stories stem from Jewish life in Poland and, while most have a folk-legend quality, there are a few which have a contemporary setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN MY FATHER'S COURT by Isaac Bashevis Singer
NON-FICTION
Released: May 2, 1966

"Effortlessness is a quality of Singer's writing, as is its endemic richness- and the rightness for its material, and it reads with as much ease as it appears to be written."
Isaac Bashevis Singer's recollections of No. 10 Korochmalna Street in Warsaw where his father officiated as a rabbi and took on the legal duties of that estate, offers him ample opportunity to give scope to his portrayal of ghetto characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHOSHA by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1978

"We miss the vividness, the claustrophobia of superior Singer; indubitably, upsettingly true, the story seems capped—and handicapped—with Destiny."
The threat of Nazi occupation throws a fence up around this story of Jewish Warsaw in the Thirties, locking it into patterns of blind dailyness and a sweet, enduring, ultimately fatal foolishness: "so long as Hitler didn't attack, so long as no revolution or pogrom erupted, each day was a gift from God." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING OF THE FIELDS by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1988

"And, simply as storytelling, this may be the weakest work of Singer's career: uninvolving, clumsily prosaic, more reminiscent of a bad-imitation Clan of the Cave Bear than anything in the Nobel Prize-winner's beguiling canon."
Singer's first novel in five years touches on many of his recurring themes (lust vs. reason, paganism vs. civilization, women as she-devils) but in a strange, largely unconvincing context: pre-medieval, primitive Poland, where assorted pagan tribes fight for control of rural neighborhoods, at odds over (among other things) whether to live by hunting or farming. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIFTS by Isaac Bashevis Singer
Released: March 26, 1985

"In all: certainly a distinguished send-off for this special-interest, limited-edition series."
These two slim volumes inaugurate the Jewish Publication Society's "The Author's Workshop" series—which will present writing-in-progress or previously unpublished (or uncollected) stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FAMILY MOSKAT by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1950

"A detailed accounting of a part of the past, of a type of life and people now wiped out, this is impressive in its scope."
A closely meshed, heavily patterned family saga, this covers the years from before World War I and up to the bombing of Warsaw of World War II in the fortunes of the Mosk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MESHUGAN by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1994

"Manna for his following, who know that wherever Singer touched pen to paper there sprang up a village — of ghosts, of survivors, of all of us."
The late Nobelist's third posthumously published novel (after Scum and The Certificate) was serialized (1981-83) in Yiddish in the Forward newspaper and was titled Lost Souls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF METHUSELAH AND OTHER STORIES by Isaac Bashevis Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1988

"So this is very much lesser Singer: always readable, of course, but rather monotonic and undernourished."
You often write on the topic of jealousy." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1960

"Almost a parable, Yasha of Lublin will have intense sympathizers, primarily among Jewish readers."
The position of Yasha Mazur in nineteenth century Poland was doubly anomalous: as a prestidigitator, hypnotist, and tight rope performer, par excellence, he mingled with and was acclaimed by every level of society and at the same time consigned to the statusless ranks of the bohemian; as a half-Jew he suffered all the restrictions placed on non-Gentiles in that society without enjoying the spiritual security the ghetto provided observant Jews. Read full book review >