Search Results: "Isabel Wilner"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BABY'S GAME BOOK by Isabel Wilner
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2000

"A winsome treasury of games that reinforce the bonds of love between parent and child. (author's note) (Picture book. 0-2)"
Wilner's (The Poetry Troupe, not reviewed) collection of games, especially for baby, engages children's entire being, from the top of their fuzzy little heads to the tips of their tiny toes, in loving play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GARDEN ALPHABET by Isabel Wilner
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 1991

"A mixed effort: not essential, but with some charming bits. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fine anthologist (The Poetry Troupe, 1977) fashions garden facts and practices into adequate, if sometimes forced, verse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUNTING COLORFUL SHAPES by Isabel Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"While not a child's first counting book, it is a beautiful one and an inspiration to caregivers to help their children find shapes in their own neighborhoods. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Close-up photographs of architectural details give young readers a counting challenge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"An intriguing and depressing tale, related with great skill and compassion."
Wilner's debut restores the legacy of Briton Hadden, co-creator of Time magazine, whose partner Henry R. Luce systematically downplayed his contributions after Hadden died, at 30, of a mysterious infection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANCOCK PARK  by Isabel Kaplan
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2009

"Neither light enough to live up to its Hollywood-style cover and flap copy nor serious enough to compete with the likes of more literary problem novels, this is a forgettable, superficial, all-around disappointment. (Fiction. YA)"
Despite her glitzy surroundings, Los Angeles junior Becky is plagued by troubles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIVIDED CROWN by Isabel Glass
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 2005

"Churning, multi-threaded, engagingly populated fan-pleaser, with no aspirations to be anything more."
More thaumaturgical turmoil in the kingdom of Karededin, in a sequel to Daughter of Exile (2004). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 11, 2005

"'Fences have so far not made for good neighbors,' Kershner concludes. A revealing report."
Border walls are nothing new. But whereas some have come tumbling down in recent years, one is rising in Israel—and, as with most things there, is a source of conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE J.A.P. CHRONICLES by Isabel Rose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2005

"Glittery—and surprisingly gritty—fun."
What drama lurks behind the smooth social facade of wealthy young Jewish women in the New York Tri-State area? Actress/screenwriter/first-novelist Rose tells all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 7, 2010

"An impressive take on the Great Migration, and a truly auspicious debut."
In her ambitious debut, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Wilkerson (Journalism, Narrative Nonfiction/Boston Univ.) examines the Great Migration of African-Americans from World War I to the 1970s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVA LUNA by Isabel Allende
Released: Oct. 21, 1988

"Lively entertainment, then, with little resonance."
Here, after last year's Of Love and Shadows, the tale of a quirky young woman's rise to influence in an unnamed South American country—with a delightful cast of exotic characters, but without the sure-handed plotting and leisurely grace of Allende's first—and best—book, The House of the Spirits (1985). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Riveting and disturbing, if somewhat incomplete."
Investigative journalist Vincent (Hitler's Silent Partners, 1997, etc.) uncovers a little-known slice of Jewish history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 19, 1995

"Fonseca's book comes at a crucial moment and could open an important discussion. (30 photos, not seen; 3 maps)"
A journalist's vivid study of Eastern Europe's Gypsies (the Roma) that explores the myths, customs, and actuality of Gypsy life while addressing the central question of Gypsy identity in the post-Holocaust 20th century. Read full book review >