Search Results: "Italo Svevo"


BOOK REVIEW

ZENO’S CONSCIENCE by Italo Svevo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2001

"A revolutionary book, and arguably (in fact, probably) the finest of all Italian novels."
A gritty English version by Italophile Weaver (Open City: Seven Writers and Rome, 1999, etc.) resurrects one of the indispensable 20th-century novels: the work of a prosperous businessman (whose real name was Ettore Schmitz), it's a majestically ironic in-depth portrayal, in his own reluctant words, of its eponymous protagonist's ruefully unromantic struggles with his domineering father, then the querulous family into which he marries, as well as the ignoble ravages of adultery and aging, psychoanalysis and tobacco addiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILIO’S CARNIVAL by Italo Svevo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Emilio's farcical psychic unraveling and gradual surrender to 'senility'—at the age of 35—are painstakingly evolved in a little-known landmark psychological novel."
A new translation of the late (1861-1923) Italian modernist's second (1898) novel (also known as A Man Grows Older), a grimly comic study of indecision and ennui that pointed the way to Svevo's later masterpiece, Zeno's Conscience (see below). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NON-EXISTENT KNIGHT and THE CLOVEN VISCOUNT by Italo Calvino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1962

"Both are interesting, but lack the basic pity and terror implicit in the most moving kinds of allegory."
These are two new fantasies by the author of The Baron in the Trees (1959) and the first is a little too thin and airy, like its protagonist- Agilulf- a knight who is armour only. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CASTLE OF CROSSED DESTINIES by William Weaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1976

"But this is by no means a pretty picture book: the narrative is lean and clear and an unusual delight."
Italo Calvino is always a surprise, and this slim volume of involuted stories absorbs a medieval sense of superstition and astonishment into its bones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCOVALDO by William Weaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 1983

"Rich with implications about the social milieu, yet far more insistent on fable-like charm than any message: a gentle, small early-Calvino treat, shrewdly translated and agreeably packaged."
In their first English translation and US publication: 20 short sketches written in the early 1950s and mid-1960s, all featuring the hapless aspirations of Marcovaldo, a father, husband, and unskilled laborer in a northern Italian city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIFFICULT LOVES by Italo Calvino
Released: Oct. 5, 1984

Dazzling early Calvino, stories from the mid-Forties and the Fifties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

T ZERO by Italo Calvino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1969

"But in science fiction he's a sophisticated novelty."
More Cosmicomics (1968) with the same concerns and conceits. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROAD TO SAN GIOVANNI by Italo Calvino
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"For the title piece and the one on Fellini, indispensable; the rest isn't memorable."
Precious little unpublished Calvino (1923-85) remains, and this is some: five slender pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COSMICOMICS by William Weaver
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1968

"MPSLUGetc etc. For science fiction devotees, in any case, clearly the most sophisticated item yet from that genre."
Metaphysical conceits are a thing of the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE USES OF LITERATURE by Italo Calvino
Released: Oct. 22, 1986

"For a genial browse through world literature with a charming host, these essays could hardly be bettered."
Apart from the oddly utilitarian-minded title, everything in this book by the Italian fantasist is lovable and worthy of attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. PALOMAR by William Weaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 1985

"Luminous, knowing, lovely literature."
The most philosophical of Calvino's works, a set of semi-comic meditations upon infinity undertaken by a nobody/Everyman named Mr. Palomar—who, as his name suggests, would like to be the clearest, adroitest, purest non-participatory observer. . .yet, since he's a man, not a telescope, can't quite pull it off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY READ THE CLASSICS? by Italo Calvino
Released: Sept. 22, 1999

"Brisk and unpretentiously sophisticated, Calvino's literary essays are invigorating, thought-provoking, and pleasurable reading."
An irrepressibly lively collection of the late Italian novelist's literary criticism. Read full book review >