Search Results: "J.N. Williamson"


BOOK REVIEW

MASQUES IV by J.N. Williamson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 29, 1991

"Some misfires, but largely a sheaf of bright storytelling."
Fourth volume, the best yet, in this sometimes waver-y series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST RITE OF HUGO T. by J.N. Catanach
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 14, 1992

"As with White Is the Color of Death (1988), a bleak view of warring men, switched allegiances, and terror, told ever so seriously."
Hugo T., an aging Polish ÇmigrÇ contemplating suicide in New York, is thwarted from diving off the George Washington Bridge by his new neighbor Elie and her friend, the Baron, who whisk him off to Paris, where they want him to impersonate his long-estranged brother—a former communist but now a parish priest deeply involved in the Solidarity movement, and in France to attend a religious conference. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Cloudscape by J.N. Courtney
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"A light read for preteens that brims with possibility but leaves too many things vague."
In Courtney's debut middle-grade book, an ordinary boy visits a wonderful world where international refugees live among the clouds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHILDREN’S WAR by J.N. Stroyar
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 12, 2001

"Toweringly intelligent, with icy touches showing how all sides dehumanize to achieve their aims. Stylish, no, but a fierce picture of massive dystopian evil."
What if . . . the Third Reich had won WWII and, 50 years later, were still around, embracing Europe, allied with the USSR, and in a truce with the North American Union? It's still the same oppressive Third Reich, all its old horrors intact, but with endless underground movements bent on destroying it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE ARE YOU? by Sarah Williamson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 6, 2017

"The whole is a pleasingly fresh take on concepts of up/down and above/below as well as a sometimes-challenging exercise in observation. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Two simply drawn worms (or maybe they are snakes), one pink and one green, play peekaboo in various locations: in the grass, on a boat, under the lily pad, in an urban setting, in a plane, through a meadow, and in the park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"For committed conservative Christian audiences. (Christian science fiction. 12 & up)"
An imaginative science-fiction premise and a well-drawn, affecting character struggle to overcome heavy-handed religious proselytizing in this uneven suspense tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ART OF BEING NORMAL by Lisa Williamson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 31, 2016

"A welcome, needed novel. (Fiction. 13-18)"
Two British transgender teens try to come to terms with their lives while facing serious bullying in their school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 17, 1997

"The vision of Scottish life created by these six voices is remarkably consistent, vital, and unyieldingly tough-minded, but it's too early to say if these promising young writers will mature into major ones, or if they'll gain much of a foothold on these shores."
Stories by six young writers, the cream of the contemporary Scottish Beats crop, are anthologized here in a raw display of life on the edge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 3, 2015

"Despite its subtitle, this uneven book is less a self-help manual than a recommendation to remove one's sexual boundaries, with good results guaranteed."
In this debut memoir, the co-founder of a famous clothing-optional resort and, later, of a sanctuary for wild cats, describes her experiences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Spiral Slayers by Rusty Williamson
Released: Jan. 1, 2013

"The first installment of an intense, philosophical sci-fi series."
Williamson's fascinating tale of benevolent aliens who've come to the human race with advanced technology and warnings from outer galaxies. Read full book review >