Search Results: "Jack Du Brul"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LIGHTNING STONES by Jack Du Brul
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"'Climatology has been hijacked by politicians and environmental activists,' and now by Du Brul. Add science fantasy, and it makes for good action-adventure."
Du Brul (Havoc, 2006, etc.) moves from co-writing Clive Cussler books back to his own intrepid geologist, Philip Mercer, for another adventure where science meets special ops.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARON'S LANDING by Jack Du Brul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"A densely detailed and well-paced thinking-man's melodrama."
A follow-up to the highly praised Vulcan's Forge (1998), again featuring engineer and geological consultant Philip Mercer, a Bond clone with a sybarite's taste for the good things in life and a Derringer strapped to his testicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAVOC by Jack Du Brul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 5, 2006

"Lays on the action with a trowel."
The meeting of a gorgeous nuclear emergency tech and a rugged, rich geologist leads to romance and the tomb of Alexander the Great, who appears to have joined the Nuclear Club two thousand years before it was formed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VULCAN'S FORGE by Jack Du Brul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1998

"Remember, Fleming could never top From Russia With Love, so come aboard now."
A debut thriller introducing Philip Mercermine engineer, geological consultant, and the only Bond clone who carries a Derringer strapped to his testicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRAGE by Clive Cussler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Above-average action from Cussler."
Cussler and Du Brul (The Jungle, 2011, etc.) draw another adventure from The Oregon Files. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 18, 2012

"An accurate but lifeless retelling."
Du Plessix Gray attempts to fictionalize the love of Marie Antoinette's life, without much success. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Serviceable but ultimately uninspiring."
Biographer/novelist/journalist du Plessix Gray (Them, 2005, etc.) brings her personal and professional expertise in French culture, letters, politics and history to a short biography of the celebrated liberal writer and political provocateur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY COUSIN RACHEL by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Feb. 11, 1951

"A gifted craftsman and spinner of yarns, Daphne du Maurier excells herself."
This comes closer to Rebecca than anything Miss du Maurier has done and is, I think, one of her best novels, ingeniously contrived as to plot, successfully realized as to characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCAPEGOAT by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Feb. 20, 1956

"A sure best seller."
In her role as a spinner of tales, Daphne du Maurier has few equals, and this, which in any other hands would be a fantastically unbelievable yarn, holds the spellbound reader with a mounting conviction that so it might have been. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

100 STEPS FOR SCIENCE by Lisa Jane Gillespie
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 6, 2017

"A broad if somewhat arbitrary survey, more suitable for casual browsing than systematic study. (glossary) (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
One hundred watershed discoveries and developments in science and technology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1989

"Although the text is probably of interest mostly to hard-core fans, more than a hundred truly gorgeous photographs broaden the appeal: prospective travelers will find itinerary inspiration, and anyone who loves the outdoors may relish a quick browse through the misty moors, seascapes, and woods of this wild and peaceful region."
Du Maurier's final book (she died last April) is both a personal memoir and a love letter to Cornwall, which served as inspiration for—and setting of—much of her popular fiction (Rebecca, Jamaica Inn, etc.). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

SNOOPING OUT STORIES WITH JACK
by Julie Danielson

I’ve probably said this before right here at my Kirkus blog, so I apologize for any redundancy, but it is a spectacular thing to hear award-winning author Jack Gantos give a presentation. Anywhere. I always want to stand up when he’s done, and (complete with lots of fist pumps) yell, “Now, that is why I chose to work in the ...


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