Search Results: "Jake Parker"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TOOTH FAIRY WARS by Kate Coombs
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 15, 2014

"Go, Nathan! Stick it to the Man...er, Fairy. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A lad's determination to keep his baby teeth sets him against not only the tooth fairy, but the whole Fay bureaucracy behind her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE SNOWPLOW by Lora Koehler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"There's always room for another well-told yarn espousing the themes of small-is-beautiful, hard work pays off, and, of course, 'I think I can.' (Picture book. 3-6)"
Despite skepticism from bigger vehicles, the small, new-kid-on-the-block snowplow works to stay fit, sure that he will be useful one day soon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE BOT AND SPARROW by Jake Parker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Dreaming keeps memories alive for a very special robot in this sweet, quiet tale. (Picture book. 4-6)"
A mechanical-avian friendship is an endearing one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISSILE MOUSE by Jake Parker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"Intelligent space opera and a realistically rounded hero will have young fans of the future demanding the next volume. (Graphic fiction. 8-12)"
When his mission to recover an ancient star compass goes wrong, intrepid Galactic Security Agent Missile Mouse finds himself saddled with a partner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ASTONISHING SECRET OF AWESOME MAN by Michael Chabon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Rest easy, regular people; you supervillains better watch out. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Chabon snags his youngest audience yet with this first-person profile of a superhero who battles both bad guys and anger issues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK GRIFFIN'S LAST BREAKFAST ON EARTH by Ned Rust
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The story could use less of the villain and more of the giant jackalope. But then, every book needs more jackalopes. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
For a story about parallel worlds, this book is hardly science fiction at all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK GRIFFIN'S FIRST BIRTHDAY ON ITH by Ned Rust
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 8, 2017

"The jokes, however, have improved since the first volume, and kids with a taste for weirdness will be eager to start again with Book 3. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
Patrick Griffin's second adventure seems to start over with every chapter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO'S THE GROSSEST OF THEM ALL? by Susan McElroy Montanari
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Since the most natural audience for a grossness contest is typically past picture books, subject and format seem to be a classic mismatch. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The latest in the unquenchable who's-the-most horrible, hideous, revolting, repulsive, disgusting, gross, and vile genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PREP by Jake Coburn
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"While the characters are hard to like and the slang gets tedious, the author's credentials as a former prep school student suggest he is reflecting a real, disturbing subculture that may well interest teen readers in and out of that world. (Fiction. YA)"
This foray into the dark side of Manhattan prep schools emphasizes details of setting over plot or character development. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LETHAL PARTNER by Jake Page
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 5, 1996

"As usual, Mo heads an agreeably venal, zany cast, and the culprit is well-hidden—if you can overlook the casually culpable use of the long arm of coincidence."
Against an uneasy backdrop of killings—two unidentified Anglo women have been found killed and discarded (one in the town dump, the other in a dumpster) over the past two weeks—Southwest Creations Gallery manager Anita Montague is murdered and shoved into a nearby drainpipe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2005

"Gripping soap opera tells a tale of the Eternal City's artistic transcendence."
A well-documented account follows the thread of ambition, pride, and betrayal that drove an unparalleled explosion of arts and architecture in Europe's 17th-century cultural capital. Read full book review >