Search Results: "James A. Owen"


BOOK REVIEW

OWEN by Kevin Henkes
by Kevin Henkes, illustrated by Kevin Henkes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A delectably amusing look at a true first love. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Owen loves his blanket "with all his heart.'' "Fuzzy'' goes where he goes and likes what he likes—"grape juice, chocolate milk...'' Leaning over the back fence, nosy Mrs. Tweezers "fills his parents in'' on various cures for Owen's affection—the "Blanket Fairy'' (Fuzzy survives safely inside Owen's pajama pants); the "vinegar trick'' (Owen finds a new favorite corner to cuddle). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAMA FOR OWEN by Marion Dane Bauer
ANIMALS
Released: March 27, 2007

"The story is dramatized more fully, although with almost no words, in Jeanette Winter's Mama (2006), and told with photographs and a fine narrative text in Owen & Mzee (2006), by Craig Hatkoff and his daughter Isabella. (Picture book. 5-7)"
The story of the baby hippopotamus named Owen who adopted Mzee, a century-old tortoise, as his mother, caught the world's imagination after the tsunami of 2004. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PRAYER FOR OWEN MEANY by John Irving
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 30, 1989

"The result is a novel that seems sincere but turns too bombastic and insistent in its opinions about literature, religion, and politics."
Irving's novels, which often begin in autobiographical commonplace, get transformed along the way: sometimes into fairy tale (The Hotel New Hampshire), sometimes into modern-day ironic fable (The World According to Garp). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRAGONS OF WINTER by James A. Owen
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"Fans of the series who managed to enjoy volumes four and five will be pleased to find more of the same. (Fantasy. 14-16)"
The Caretakers fight the mind-controlling Echthroi through a tangle of timelines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE, THERE BE DRAGONS by James A. Owen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Clumsy racial stereotyping was forgivable in 1917, but much less so nearly a century later. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
This ambitious fantasy falls short of the mark. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INDIGO KING by James A. Owen
Released: Oct. 21, 2008

"Except for those who get a kick out of playing Spot-the-Literary-Allusion, this is missable. (Fantasy. YA)"
This third entry in the Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica brings 1930s caretakers John and Jack (aka J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis) into an alternate universe where history has been rewritten and the Winter King reigns supreme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Full of unmet potential. (Fantasy. YA)"
Narrative tension can't save this sequel from glaring flaws. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SPY CALLED JAMES by Anne Rockwell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"With new historical narratives complicating the period for adults, this well-meant picture book comes off as timid rather than disruptive, leaving children with the usual incomplete story, albeit with an African-American protagonist. (further reading) (Informational picture book. 7-11)"
Built from an exhaustive search of a mostly unwritten history, Rockwell's account recasts the American Revolution from the experience of one of the courageous thousands who fought to gain independence from British rule—an independence that did not equate to freedom for the enslaved black population. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: May 8, 2007

In a seamless blend of fact and fancy, the author delivers a quick, name-dropping history of piracy's golden age in the Caribbean, along with the enticing news that many of those buccaneers commissioned treasure maps from a family of Charleston mapmakers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROMNEY by Owen Wister
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Like Wharton's best work, the unfinished Romney, along with Wister's essays about Philadelphia society, remains striking for its examination of American social pathologies that, despite changes in ethnic, cultural and technological composition, remain virulently prevalent today."
An unfinished third novel, with three additional essays, about a contentedly corrupt belle époque Philadelphia—where the famed Wister (1860-1938) went west to cure his depression after William Dean Howells rejected his first attempts at fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Their story is recapitulated in this volume, so even if they don't own the first, eager young readers can catch right up and be mesmerized, mystified and charmed. (natural history, maps, notes) (Picture book. 5-10)"
In 2005, this father-daughter team, with the ecologist and the photographer, chronicled the irresistible story of the baby hippopotamus, orphaned by the December 2004 tsunami, which imprinted on the more-than-a-century-old Aldabra tortoise in a nature preserve in Kenya. Read full book review >