Search Results: "James Atlas"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 9, 2006

"A work of cumulative, powerful impact: This author doesn't allow anyone, readers included, to evade life's tough questions."
Boxing commentator and former trainer Atlas describes a youth spent looking for love and recognition in all the wrong places, until he found it inside the ropes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 1992

"An amiable handbook to the great debate: intelligent, personable, and informed, if not managing to become unusually cutting or deep."
From Atlas (Delmore Schwartz, 1977; The Great Pretender, 1986)—a slim, plain, and mainly sensible little guide to the crisis in the university. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES by James Atlas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2005

"Arresting, thought-provoking, frightening, glorious."
Long-time literary journalist Atlas (Bellow, 2000, etc.) contemplates life and death in 11 poignant essays that chronicle the trials of growing older. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHADOW IN THE GARDEN by James Atlas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A brutally honest examination of the biographical craft and a good companion piece to Richard Holmes' This Long Pursuit (2017)."
An illuminating account of a career as a biographer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOD ATLAS by Giulia  Malerba
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2017

"A scrumptious concept but overcooked. (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
Picture the endless variety of foods that make up the world's menus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 28, 1999

"McGrath wants us to share his enthusiasm for the 'freedom and speed' of the open road, but these sluggish prose pieces and poems barely reach 55."
This fourth collection by the much-awarded (and this-round MacArthur grant recipient) Florida International University creative-writing professor continues the sense (from Spring Comes to Chicago and the other books) that McGrath fancies himself working a genre all his own: prose riffs that sometimes tell little stories but are not bound by the conventions of narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIME ATLAS by Robert  Hegarty
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2017

"A disaster from start to finish—Eurocentric, culturally inclusive only in the most perfunctory way, paltry both in content and in special effects. (Informational novelty. 10-12)"
A set of topical timelines offer wide-angle views of human culture, works, technology, and daily life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Defining Atlas by Stone Michaels
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2015

"Sturdy, exuberant verse."
Like the demigod from which it takes its name, Defining Atlas is a durable, uplifting volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORLD ATLAS by Nick Crane
by Nick Crane, illustrated by David Dean, developed by TouchPress
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2012

"Not useful for reference, though an enticing plaything for younger armchair travelers. (iPad informational app. 5-8)"
Animations and clever enhancements give this elementary atlas more flash than its print version (2011), but the content remains skimpy and poorly organized. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOUD ATLAS by David Mitchell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 24, 2004

"Sheer storytelling brilliance. Mitchell really is his generation's Pynchon."
Great Britain's answer to Thomas Pynchon outdoes himself with this maddeningly intricate, improbably entertaining successor to Ghostwritten (2000) and Number9Dream (2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ATLAS by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"One weeps somewhat reflexively for the lost souls mirrored in these fragments; more heartfelt, unfortunately, is a horror at the squandering of such a prodigious prose talent. (Author tour)"
Making a bid for the bleakest book of the year, Vollmann (Butterfly Stories, 1993, etc.) fashions a world-wide web of despair in a palindrome of 53 stories, each having to do with sorrow or loss, and often involving the hopeless lives of whores from Cambodia to Canada. Read full book review >