Search Results: "James D. Hornfischer"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 2004

"Easily merits pride of place among the flotilla of books appearing in recent years on 'the greatest generation.' (B&w maps)"
A thrilling narrative of the Battle off Samar, a two-and-a-half-hour melee in which outgunned American sailors fended off a Japanese attack that could have stymied the invasion of the Philippines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Though oddly selective—the battles of Leyte Gulf and the Philippines, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa are barely mentioned—this is a thoroughly satisfying account of the final years of World War II."
A skillful history of the final days of World War II, during which "America mastered the vast geopolitics of the Pacific." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 7, 2006

"A mostly compelling, long-overdue saga of the famous ship."
A forgotten chapter of heroism, brutality and survival from the opening days of World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Sure to please military and WWII buffs, but may leave others unsatisfied."
Hornfischer (Ship of Ghosts: The Story of the USS Houston, FDR's Legendary Lost Cruiser, and the Epic Saga of Her Survivors, 2006, etc.) chronicles the World War II Pacific campaign to capture and hold Guadalcanal from the Japanese. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERVICE by Marcus Luttrell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2012

"An action-packed, occasionally reflective saga of contemporary military service."
A Navy combat veteran showcases the deadly operations in Iraq, promoting American military duty as ennobling in the service of humanity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOYS OF SAN JOAQUIN by D. James Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Set in the early 1950s, this upbeat tale offers a strong sense of place, plenty of growing-up and enough spirited characters to justify Paolo's opening, enticingly annotated, cast of characters. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Smith invites readers to travel an even Longer Way from Chicago with this summertime, old-time, small-town slice-of-life, as viewed by a hilariously matter-of-fact young resident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Engaging light reading, but not world class. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Twelve-year-old Paolo is not ready for a real job or a girlfriend but he gets both—a paper route, shared with his brother and cousin, and romance, when his friend Theresa volunteers to help him look for the dog-napped family pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST PARADISE by James D. Houston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"An uneven, intriguing effort."
Diffuse, now-and-then enchanting mystery set in modern Hawaii. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO VIRTUE by James D. Brewer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1995

"Though there's never much doubt about who really killed Cassie Pierce, Williamson, Baldridge, and Tyner have a high old time bringing the culprits to book in this lively Reconstruction tale."
Talk about starting with a bang. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHAMAN'S GAME by James D. Doss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Feeble threads of a sad story are laced into an elaborately mystical narrative, but only the most patient of readers, or students of Indian lore, will care enough to ferret them out from what, in all, is a repetitive mass of visions, nightmares, tribal tales, and ancient myths."
The fourth in the legend-infused chronicle set in the hills and canyons of Colorado, where native Charlie Moon is a policeman on the Ute reservation near the village of Ignacio (The Shaman's Bones, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHAMAN SINGS by James D. Doss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"An encore would be welcome."
Ute Indian prophecy, scientific investigation, cryptanalysis, and old-fashioned intuition join forces to solve the murder of star Rocky Mountain Polytechnic grad student Priscilla Song, whose breakthrough research in room-temperature superconductivity would have made her rich and famous if she hadn't been strangled, stabbed, and gutted (a case of demented overkill that's one of the very best clues in this well-clued mystery). Read full book review >