Search Results: "James D. Watson"


BOOK REVIEW

AVOID BORING PEOPLE by James D. Watson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2007

"Vintage Watson: brash, bumptious, brilliant—and never boring."
Age cannot whither nor custom stale the sharp tongue of "Honest Jim"—the title the Nobel Prize-winning Watson (DNA: The Secret of Life, 2003, etc.) originally wanted for The Double Helix, his first tell-all account of science and personal history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 5, 2002

"Watson seems more tempered this time around, especially in the treatment of Rosalind Franklin. But the urge to reveal all will surely upset a few who may not see it that way at all."
Part memoir, part love story, part homage to the brilliant physicist George ("Geo," pronounced Joe) Gamow, this is another tell-all tale in the tradition of The Double Helix. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 19, 1967

"It all seems remarkably fresh and impulsive and adventitious."
Even without understanding any of the scientific data processed here, the general reader will find it hard to remain immune to this account of how J.D. Watson, along with another bright, volatile young man—Francis Crick, discovered DNA, the fundamental genetic material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DNA by James D. Watson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 7, 2003

"A grand tour of epochal events in biology history."
Timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Watson-Crick double helix model, and with a PBS series on the history of DNA hosted by Watson, this blockbuster recaps how it happened, what came before, where we are today, and what the future may hold. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"Readers old or new are in for a fine treat; there really has been nothing in the history of science writing comparable to Watson's tell-all memoir."
The classic Double Helix (1968) is here again, this time annotated and illustrated and told in all the bold, brash, bumptious style that has become Watson's (Avoid Boring People and Other Lessons from a Life in Science, 2007, etc.) trademark in the intervening years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 24, 2017

"In this bible of DNA information, Watson is as provocative and optimistic as ever."
A masterful summary of genetic science past, present, and future, from one of its prime movers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAKE YOUR MOVE by James Watson
Released: Dec. 1, 1990

Nine hard-hitting, powerfully written stories with such themes as intolerance, betrayal, and the futility of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO SURRENDER by James Watson
ADVENTURE
Released: April 15, 1993

"Mandela is free; but her work, and the war, go on. (Fiction. YA)"
A lean, staccato style propels this bitter tale of guerrilla warfare in Angola. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO WENT APE by Richard Jesse Watson
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Too bad it's got nowhere really to go. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Richard Watson applies a twist to the prince-and-pauper theme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 27, 1992

"Sweet little basket of nuts and berries."
Some 150 letters home by the young Faulkner, who is way up north in New York and New Haven, or in New Orleans or in France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POINT MAN by James Watson
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"The text, which has about as much subtlety and sensitivity as a swift kick to the groin, includes 12 b&w photos—not seen."
A veteran's salty recollections of what it meant to be a member of the Navy SEALs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARS AT PLAY by Rick Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"After hearing this, they will not view the passing cars in the same way. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Cars play games, eat snacks, get dirty, and have to take baths in this rhymed look at how cars like to have fun. Read full book review >