Search Results: "James Dickey"


BOOK REVIEW

TUCKY THE HUNTER by James Dickey
POETRY
Released: Oct. 11, 1978

"Milne carried it off but Tucky, failing to resonate, remains Grandpa's loving trifle."
Will adults really enjoy these forgettable verses inspired by Dickey's grandson? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1968

"The best pieces here are the tributes to Roethke, Aiken, Marianne Moore, and the solid analyses of five classics."
James Dickey's reputation as a critic is based on plain speaking and the lauding of sound, humane, even homey values. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE WHITE SEA by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A ruthless adventure of body and soul by a writer of mature- -even awesome—powers."
Dickey doesn't write many novels—three in 23 years—but he makes every one count. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALNILAM by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 1987

"His chest was the sound of a coring-drill; in his belly, it massed with the unbroken sullenness of organ music'), and the result overall—rather ping-ponging and eye-crossing—is one less of reward than of a long and wearying confusion."
In Dickey's first novel since Deliverance (1970), Frank Cahill, who owns and runs a public swimming pool in Atlanta before WW II, goes blind from a raging case of diabetes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRENGTH OF FIELDS by James Dickey
Released: Dec. 1, 1979

"This is a pleasant, sometimes inspired, new collection."
In a mode similar to that of his last book, Zodiac—the translation of a shipwrecked Dutchman's mad musing—many of these poems are Dickey's own sprawling, slightly mad narratives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 13, 1970

"Alas, lately he has shown a hunger to be king of the hill; foolishly reaching to the sky he can only embarrass his admirers."
It is hard to be a religious poet, even, or especially, in the pantheist, humanist, autobiographical twentieth century mode of James Dickey. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POEMS, 1957-1967 by James Dickey
Released: June 1, 1967

"Masculine, compassionate, essentially conservative, Dickey's poems are incarnations of remembered joy and pain, a quietly intense celebration of the senses, an acceptance of the inherently tragic yet wonder-awakening landscape of man—the qualities, in short, of a good national poet circa the sixties."
James Dickey, fresh from winning a National Book Award and an appointment as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress, has also recently been enshrined in one of Life magazine's pictorial essays where the Dow Jones rating was a smashing "presently the hottest of emerging U.S. poets." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ZODIAC by James Dickey
Released: Oct. 8, 1976

"Intense and ardent solipsism, not Dickey at his best."
The Zodiac is a long poem, a short book; as Dickey explains in a prefatory note, it's loosely based on another poem of the same title, written by a Dutch sailor before his death by storm at sea in 1940. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DELIVERANCE by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 23, 1970

"If so, a good deal more finesse, symbolic or otherwise, would surely seem necessary to sustain, or even make significant, such headlong events."
James Dickey's first novel is an ambitious tale of adventure in which character is tested, quite literally, if preposterously, through action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"We are very likely in the presence of work-in-progress, of an evolving style; as such Dickey's Thoreau-like contemplation can be better evaluated in the future."
Dickey's third volume of verse is both an advance on the other two, and a disappointment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1965

"He is, alas, a bit too prolific, even facile."
James Dickey's new volume of poems is not an advance over, but merely an extension of his well-received Helmets. of last year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1986

"The dark tone is reminiscent of Sendak's Outside Over There but this is longer and more complex, with more adult than child appeal."
This epic poem is an outgrowth of the stories a famous poet told his little daughter; it is a very personal book; Dickey's adult readers will share his enjoyment in "mythologizing" his own child. Read full book review >