Search Results: "James E. Morriss"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1972

The authors supplement lucid reports on areas of brain research — from Penfield's mapping of the cerebral cortex to Delgado's development of electrical stimulation of the brain — with intriguing speculation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 15, 1970

"The authors know How Animals Learn (1969)—human animals—and they foster a sense of discovery."
Natural and experimental examples expand a word to the dimensions of a concept: instinct is first defined—"behavior that is inborn and does not have to be learned"; then its properties are refined—the term is descriptive but not fully explanatory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIN & REDEMPTION by James E. McCarthy
Released: Nov. 16, 2016

"A rare, hopeful crime story that also manages to be deeply honest."
A debut novel delivers a journey through poverty and the heroin trade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT IS THE WIND by Ferida Wolff
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2005

"A visual and onomatopoetic triumph. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Prose and pictures perfectly echo the sounds and sights of a summer night in the country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEET CLARA AND THE FREEDOM QUILT by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A well-told, handsomely illustrated story that effectively dramatizes young Clara's perseverance and courage. (Young Reader/Picture book. 5- 10)"
When Sweet Clara, not yet 12, is taken from her mother and sent from North Farm to Home Plantation as a field hand, she's put in the care of ``Aunt Rachel,'' not ``my for-real blood aunt, but she did her best.'' Fearing for Clara's health, Rachel teaches her to sew and is lucky enough to get her a place in the Big House, where Clara listens, learns, and saves scraps that she eventually pieces into a map-quilt showing the way to the Ohio and freedom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE ROPES by James Vance
Released: March 11, 2013

"The old world isn't coming back, but at least one more volume of this series appears inevitable."
An oft-praised graphic novel of the Depression era belatedly spawns a sequel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY TEACHER by James E. Ransome
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 26, 2012

"Still, as a Teacher Appreciation Day gift, it's a mighty nice alternative to an apple. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A young girl sporting dreadlocks addresses readers directly, telling them all about her teacher in an attempt to explain why the elderly woman continues to teach in her school rather than retiring or teaching "across town, where the sun always shines." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW RED BIKE! by James E. Ransome
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"The very brief text and simply drawn figures suspended in generous quantities of white space give this a superficially appealing look, but Ander's Me and My Bike (2008) or Cari Best's Sally Jean the Bicycle Queen, illustrated by Christine Davenier (2006), convey a fledgling bicyclist's joy more effectively and coherently. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A usually accomplished illustrator tries for extreme simplicity and takes a header with this confused and confusing episode. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MODERN SAVAGE by James E. McWilliams
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"While McWilliams offers convincing arguments for animal rights, they are undermined by the extensive quotes, which become tiresome and offer little useful context."
McWilliams (History/Texas State Univ.; The Pecan: A History of America's Native Nut, 2013, etc.) takes issue with the locavore movement, which preaches compassionate care of farm animals on nonindustrial farms but slaughters those animals in the end.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 26, 2009

"Rich in research, provocative in conception and nettlesome to both the right and the left."
McWilliams (History/Texas State Univ.; A Revolution in Eating: How the Quest for Food Shaped America, 2005, etc.) argues for moderation and compromise in today's raging food fights. Read full book review >