Search Results: "James Forrester"


BOOK REVIEW

THE FINAL SACRAMENT by James Forrester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"An enjoyable yarn. Sensitive readers might shed a tear or two at the end, so keep the tissues handy."
Forrester brings his Elizabethan-era trilogy (Sacred Treason, 2012, etc.) to a fitting and dramatic close. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROOTS OF BETRAYAL by James Forrester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2013

"A winner for any reader who loves historical, action-packed novels."
Forrester delves deeply into 16th-century intrigue to deliver a whale of a yarn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"A heartwarming account of risk-taking, iconoclastic doctors who achieved extraordinary cardiovascular breakthroughs and of the patients who trusted them."
A scientific memoir/biography of the significant achievements of heart doctors through the years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEO AND THE LESSER LION by Sandra Forrester
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2009

"Solid and satisfying. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
A Depression-era tale set in tiny Lenore, Ala., may not have immediate or obvious appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEEL OF THE MOON by Sandra Forrester
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 31, 2000

"Readers will appreciate Pen's resilience in the face of one terrible loss after another, and will applaud her steady courage. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An orphan loses one home and travels far before finding another in this bustling tale, set in 17th-century England and America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 4, 1998

"But very few readers not well-versed in philosophy, Freud, and Lacan will be able to do so."
Two long, very intricate essays: one on the implications of both the inescapability of lying in life and its centrality in psychoanalysis; the other on the nature of money—or, better, of obligation and indebtedness—particularly as seen in Freud's Rat Man case study. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Vogel House by John Forrester
Released: May 29, 2013

"A thrilling romance about what happens when rich people lose almost everything."
In Forrester's (Shadow Mage, 2012, etc.) young-adultnovel, a teen finds herself in over her head as she tries to save her home and family from personal and financial destruction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FEMALE DETECTIVE by Andrew Forrester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The creaking dialogue and halting, step-by-step-by-step deductions, which guarantee a glacial pace, will keep most of the curious at bay; this is no overlooked gem. But feminists and historical completists, the most likely readers to persevere, will find themselves amply rewarded by detective tales that more often focus on how and why than whodunit."
The latest reprint in the British Library Crime Classics is one of the earliest: a cycle of stories about a London detective first published in 1864, here introduced by Alexander McCall Smith, who ventures general remarks about female detectives, and Mike Ashley, who supplies some uncommonly informative historical background. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NARROW RIVER, WIDE SKY by Jenny Forrester
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 16, 2017

"A modest, thoughtful memoir that traces hard-won liberation from the past."
The landscape and culture of west Colorado are vividly evoked in an accomplished literary debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUST FROM OLD BONES by Sandra Forrester
Released: Aug. 25, 1999

"The novel is flawed by wispy characterizations and Simone's whiny voice, but the preface and afterword tell of a fascinating and little-known piece of American history that may draw readers in. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Far more engaging for its history than its story, this novel in the form of a diary never catches fire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY HOME IS OVER JORDAN by Sandra Forrester
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

A sequel to Sound the Jubilee (1995, not reviewed) that does not stand on its own, but which will be welcomed by readers of the first book. Read full book review >