Search Results: "James Herbert"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GHOSTS OF SLEATH by James Herbert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Familiar stuff, working toward Sleath's invasion by a flesh- mist, but page by page Herbert grips by anchoring us into his skeptical psychic investigator."
For his 17th horror novel, Herbert goes back to Haunted (1989) to recover his footing after some weaker tries to scare the reader. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH by James Herbert
Released: Dec. 11, 2012

"A yarn that has almost everything wrong with it, yet still reveals a compelling truth."
Curious blend of supernatural horror and conspiracy theory, from the veteran ghost-chaser (The Secret of Crickley Hall, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Wah-Say-Lan: Seneca Warrior by James Herbert Smith
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Solid historical fiction dedicated to historical accuracy, sometimes at the expense of rip-roaring storytelling."
Smith (Wah-Say-Lan: A Tale of the Iroquois in the American Revolution, 2009) braids together historical fact and fiction in this YA version of a tale he's spun before as a novel—one that's full of passion, romance, loss, and carefully researched historical information.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTHERS by James Herbert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Even so, Nick Dismas remains one of the most tenderly drawn monsters since Hugo's bell-ringer. ($75,000 ad/promo)"
Prolific horror writer Herbert (Portent, 1996, etc.) revives a sentimental favorite, Victor Hugo's Quasimodo, dresses him up in a modern setting, and sends him forth as Nicholas Dismas, private investigator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONCE... by James Herbert
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2001

"Leaf-clogged suspense until a slashing succubus appears to add stress to Thom's recovery."
After ringing changes on Victor Hugo in Others (1999), Herbert now takes us to a fairyland decidedly not out of James M. Barrie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PORTENT by James Herbert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1996

"This may be Herbert's best novel, its prose keen, characters crisp, and pace terrific, though the world-shattering end is disappointly unsurprising and generic."
Herbert's 18th horror novel works toward another of his familiar apocalyptic climaxes (The Ghosts of Sleath, 1995, etc.) but features perhaps his finest writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

To Jonah, When You Are Twenty-Five by James Herbert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2014

"A smart memoir, wrapped inside an overly didactic advice book."
Herbert's (Creating the AHRC, 2008) latest book—half epistolary memoir, half advice guide— tells young adults why they should be serious about their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

'48 by James Herbert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1997

"But the plot goes forward like a tiresome movie crunchfest, action scene upon action scene, boom upon boom."
Mad Max meets dystopian London bloodsuckers three years after the Allies lose WW II, in a what-if tale by the author of (among 18 others) the much richer, or at least completely different, Portent (1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOT PLACE by Herbert Resnicow
Released: Jan. 10, 1990

Once again, gruff, golden-hearted venture-capitalist Ed Baer and his clever son and partner Warren have a murder to deal with—this time in the steam room of Long Island's Oakdale Country Club, to which they both belong. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 4, 2005

"Heroes and villains, good guys and bad: white-hot dissent from a practiced pen."
There's a fire burning in America's basement, New York Times columnist Herbert urges in this well-chosen collection of op-ed pieces. No one's rushing to put it out. Instead, "we're behaving as if we cannot even smell the smoke." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL WITH THE BOTTICELLI EYES by Herbert Lieberman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Lieberman's knowing portrait of the international art world, the tautly paced plot, and his two complex, believable protagonists make this a highly effective work, though some may find the details of the serial killer's labors decidedly unpleasant."
All Mike Manship, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, wants to do is stage the definitive show of Renaissance painter Botticelli. Read full book review >