Search Results: "James Jones"


BOOK REVIEW

SOME CAME RUNNING by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1957

"And it is so badly written that at no moment in its ghastly length does Jones hold out hope that he is likely to write another creditable book."
To all who felt that From Here to Eternity, with all its crudities, nonetheless showed promise in a newcomer, Some Came Running, will be a sharp disappointment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 10, 1975

"A certain seller nevertheless."
Not just another coffee-table picture book on World War II, but a collection of graphic art accompanied by James Jones' whittlings at his Schtick. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIET JOURNAL by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 1974

"Which war is he talking about anyway?"
A day-by-day account of the novelist's travels around Vietnam right before the US troop pull-out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROM HERE TO ETERNITY by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 26, 1951

"Publisher backing ($10,000 initial advertising); the impact of the book on the first readers; the certain storm of controversy, all make certain a terrific send-off for an impressive first novel."
A controversial reception is a safe prediction for this already heralded first novel — that and a wide market along the lines of The Naked and The Dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO TO THE WIDOW-MAKER by James Jones
Released: April 10, 1967

"Q-ueue up."
Ron Grant, one of the "Chosen" i.e. beautiful people, a successful playwright, is down in Jamaica taking up skin-diving in an attempt to search for his "Manhood." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PISTOL by James Jones
Released: Jan. 12, 1958

"Jones has proved that he doesn't need the false props of salacious depravity to give substance to his characterizations."
Not a major novel this, but those of us who felt that From Here to Eternity showed immense promise and its successor, Some Came Running, was a ghastly letdown, will be heartened. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THIN RED LINE by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 1962

"The discipline of the short novel, The Pistol, has brought to Jones' accurate and sensitive description, a spare, direct dialogue related to a life and death world of men without women, men at war."
James Jones examines the bloody Guadalcanal campaign in his giant army story, after dissecting the hardcore army man in From Here to Eternity and bringing a World War II veteran back to his mid-Western home town beginning in some Came Running. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STREET JUSTICE SERVED by James Jones
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 23, 2013

"Violent overkill that'll be too much for most readers."
In Jones' bloody novel, a pair of violent criminals travels from Texas to New York, murdering, raping and robbing as they go. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 31, 1989

Some 115 letters by the author of From Here to Eternity. covering most of his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHISTLE by James Jones
Released: March 1, 1978

"But admirers of Eternity and Thin Red Line will find him striving to draw the last sparks and puffs from his great single subject—manhood tested by combat—and will feel that he succeeds decisively enough to make this the last third of the great American WW II novel."
A truly gratifying recovery of Jones' reputation after a long slump since the holding action of The Thin Red Line (1962). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ICE-CREAM HEADACHE by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 27, 1968

"A series of headaches from melting pistachio."
James Jones presents James Jones in some wavering paragraphs introducing this collection of stories—some published, some stillborn, most old, one brand new, nothing, we are pleased to say, borrowed wittingly, and most of them strangled blue with tremulous posturing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MERRY MONTH OF MAY by James Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1970

"Jones-Hartley has been living in Paris long enough to say 'while I was making my toilet'; he's also old enough to be a benevolently avuncular observer and to mention, en passant, Irwin Shaw who like Jones shared a time that was, as well as a future that might have been."
Were it not for the Jones name, one could easily admit that this is no better or worse than any aliterary novel of this kind which attempts to convert a scene into a property. Read full book review >