Search Results: "James K. Galbraith"


BOOK REVIEW

JAMES K. POLK by John Seigenthaler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 4, 2004

"Against many historians, Seigenthaler applauds Polk for achievements that he insists are 'nothing short of remarkable, changing forever the geography and economy of the country.'"
James K. Polk waged war against Mexico, and almost against Britain, to increase the size of the US by a full third. Yet, writes fellow Tennessean Seigenthaler, "somehow he is the least acknowledged among our presidents, which is somewhat mystifying." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INEQUALITY by James K. Galbraith
NON-FICTION
Released: March 10, 2016

"An arguable thesis, perhaps, but an evenhanded view of a topic generating much heat."
Economist Galbraith (Univ. of Texas; The End of Normal: The Great Crisis and the Future of Growth, 2014, etc.) ventures an anti-Pikettian view of the sharply divisive fact that not all wallets are created equal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1998

"Sophisticated but accessible and powerful arguments for the open-minded."
A tour de force by an economist not so handicapped by theoretical orthodoxy that clear thinking is impossible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 2, 1989

Galbraith (Economics/U. of Texas; and former executive director of the Joint Economic Committee of Congress) weighs in with a neomercantilist solution to America's trade and budget deficits. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE END OF NORMAL by James K. Galbraith
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"A cleareyed, if dismaying analysis of the new normal, 'a qualitatively different form of capitalism' for the 21st century."
A renowned economist argues that the days of easy growth and full employment are over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 30, 2012

"Economics specialists will enjoy this book, but so too will general readers disenchanted with current economic orthodoxies."
A new approach to economic analysis based on the idea that "you can't actually study economic inequality without measuring it." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 21, 2016

"A book best read by policy wonks of a numerate bent but accessible to noneconomists as well."
A series of essays, letters, and other documents examining the latest Greek tragedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

K by Hong Ying
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"A delicate and exquisite success: Hong infuses real life with the drama and pathos of the best fiction."
A fictionalized account of a love affair Julian Bell conducted with a Chinese woman during the mid-1930s, by London-based novelist Hong (Summer of Betrayal, 1997; a memoir, Daughter of the River, 1999). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Establishment writing about a brilliant rebel—barely a start at chronicling this Will Rogers of economics."
Brief and tame biography of the colorful and renowned economist and cultural critic, by Lamson (In the Vanguard: Six American Women in Public Life, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Accessible, well-written approach to both Galbraith's life and the larger issues to which he has so effectively devoted his thought: an exemplary intellectual biography."
A fittingly oversized life of the eminent economist, philosopher, writer, and diplomat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOSSIER K by Imre Kertész
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 7, 2013

"The author's novels may provide a better introduction to his work, but this memoir will help to further illuminate them."
Kertész, the first Hungarian writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, interrogates himself in a provocative memoir that will deepen the understanding of those already familiar with his novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

K STREET by M.A. Lawson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"With characters as flat as construction paper and a formulaic plot, this book manages what other thrillers about the NSA have failed to do: make it boring."
Kay Hamilton—former Drug Enforcement Administration agent and woman of steel—takes on the all-knowing National Security Agency in the third entry in Lawson's series (Viking Bay, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >