Search Results: "James Kelman"


BOOK REVIEW

KIERON SMITH, BOY by James Kelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Though it's a vivid reminder that childhood is a foreign country, the book is way too long and self-indulgent."
A child's vision of his rough-and-tumble world occupies the latest from Scottish author Kelman (You Have to Be Careful in the Land of the Free, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MO SAID SHE WAS QUIRKY by James Kelman
Released: April 23, 2013

"Though it lacks much of an arc, the novel's brevity and lack of affect are to its credit: a gritty and wise snapshot of urban life."
A bracing stream-of-consciousness tale of life on London's lower rungs from the veteran Scottish novelist and Booker Prize winner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DISAFFECTION by James Kelman
Released: March 20, 1989

Glasgow writer Kelman (Greyhound for Breakfast, 1987) follows a bumbling, lovesick Everyman on his daily rounds as he teaches, drinks, and broods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIRT ROAD by James Kelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2017

"A rich tale of family, dislocation, the joys of creativity, and the torment of painful choices."
An award-winning Scottish author sets his coming-of-age story in the U.S. South, where a father and son on holiday from rural Scotland discover life can be as wrenching as death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU HAVE TO BE CAREFUL IN THE LAND OF THE FREE by James Kelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2004

"Ethnic prose authentically rendered fails to congeal into a persuasive whole."
From Booker-winning Kelman (How Late It Was, How Late, 1994, etc.) comes a vividly written, if meandering, portrait of a Scottish immigrant to America on the eve of his first trip home in 12 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRANSLATED ACCOUNTS by James Kelman
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 16, 2001

"A frustrating and difficult work that fails, albeit ambitiously, perhaps even nobly."
In his first since the Booker-winning How Late It Was, How Late (1994), Kelman essays a wildly different piece of experimentation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUSTED SCOTCH by James Kelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 1997

"Giving a crisp measure of the author's vision, these are tales that further demonstrate Kelman's angry, distinctive voice and his unsettling vision of modern life. (The Great Scots Reading Tour with Irvine Welsh, Duncan McLean, and James Kelman)"
Capitalizing on his 1995 Booker novel, How late it was, how late, Kelman offers this compendium of 35 stories—10 culled from his only other collection to have appeared here (Greyhound for Breakfast, 1988)—portraying the down-and-out of Scottish society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES JOYCE by Alfonso Zapico
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A solid account of the development of a writer not easy to encapsulate."
A graphic biography of the literary master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

C.L.R. JAMES by Kent Worcester
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"EWSLUGCLR James emerges from this engaging book as a man who lived his life fully and whose work is worthy of further study, and Worcester has done much to rescue his subject from oblivion."
Well-crafted biography of a man once characterized as ``the sharpest and most interesting mind that the British Caribbean has produced in three centuries of learning.'' Although the Trinidadian writer and activist Cyril Lionel Robert James (190189) was at the center of many political and literary movements in his time, he is little known today. ``By the 1960s,'' Worcester observes, ``he was an elder radical statesperson on several continents, famous for his writing and historical impact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES DEAN by Val Holley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 30, 1995

"A biography by the numbers that never quite adds up. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The author of this quotidian, excessively anecdotal life of James Dean has done a lot of research, but too rarely does he conjoin it with any real understanding. Read full book review >