Search Results: "James Lee Burke"


BOOK REVIEW

WAYFARING STRANGER by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2014

"Instead of focusing on the wages of long-ago sin, as he generally does, Burke (Light of the World, 2013) shows the sins actually being committed over several fraught years in the nation's history. The result is a new spaciousness married to his fine-tuned sense of retribution."
A sequel to the Hackberry Holland trio (Feast Day of Fools, 2011, etc.) that's also an unofficial prequel to most of Burke's other 32 novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIGHT OF THE WORLD by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 2013

"Pruning away the florid subplots that often clutter his heaven-storming blood baths, Burke produces his most sharply focused, and perhaps his most harrowing, study of human evil, refracted through the conventions of the crime novel."
Dave Robicheaux's latest Montana vacation is beset by demons old and new. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PURPLE CANE ROAD by James Lee Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 15, 2000

"Though the links among felonies can be insultingly casual, and the mystery is no more mysterious than a ritual sacrifice, Burke's powerfully evoked world shows why the past, as Faulkner said, not only isn't dead; it isn't even past."
Another round of violence in New Iberia Parish leads sheriff's investigator Dave Robicheaux (Sunset Limited, 1998, etc.) to reopen the darkest mystery he's ever faced: the murder of his mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST GET-BACK BOOGIE by James Lee Burke
Released: Nov. 21, 1986

"Lots of true grit and a little tenderness combine to make this an absorbing tale of modern life on the range."
Bulging with virile prose, this good-hearted novel grabs you by the collar, roughs you up a bit, then buys you a drink afterwards. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONVICT by James Lee Burke
Released: Nov. 24, 1985

"But on the whole, Burke, who has mostly published novels heretofore, seems message-heavy and schematic at shorter length."
Burke's stories frequently set up situations for good to conquer evil, for the disadvantaged to prove themselves more alive than the advantaged, for the wronged to take revenge—there's an old-fashioned Southern liberalism to them that seems morally worthy but artistically hollow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HALF OF PARADISE by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1965

"A drear perspective, and yet, in its absence of sensationalism, its compassion and simplicity, this initial effort merits some attention."
These days magnolias mean misery, and there is plenty of Southern anguish in this first novel, which, nevertheless, carries an honest message, crisply understated and freshly slanted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JEALOUS KIND by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Burke's gritty coming-of-age tale is a typically entertaining read that may cap a trilogy but also begs for a sequel."
The Holland clan that features in various series by the prolific author appears this time in 1952 Houston, where street gangs, mobsters, and class conflict offer a grim view of postwar America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"Burke's sure hand for crisp dialogue and a compelling story falters with the philosophizing he allows his wayward lawman to wallow in a bit too often. But then, resourceful warriors from Odysseus on have tended to ruminate."
The Holland clan of Texas lawmen and lawyers who populate one of the author's several crime series expands its family tree backward to the early 20th century with the exploits of a truly ornery good guy and his scary Austrian nemesis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JESUS OUT TO SEA by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2007

"If some of the endings are rushed or unconvincing or just plain AWOL, that's because Burke understands that conflicts like these, even spun out to novel length, never truly end."
Eleven violent, heartfelt slices of life among the underdogs of the Louisiana bayous and Texas plains from acclaimed mystery novelist Burke (Pegasus Descending, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNING ANGEL by James Lee Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"But the ingredients this time are so familiar—the tormented vet, the moralizing killer, the buried treasure that should've stayed buried, and of course Dave's own barely governable violence—that he seems to be writing almost as formulaically as Dick Francis."
Burke's last several novels have shown a deepening fascination with the weight of past history; here, in his ninth Dave Robicheaux adventure (Dixie City Jam, 1994, etc.), a treasure buried by Jean Lafitte joins a telltale set of Vietnam-era dog tags to drag his characters down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAY DOWN MY SWORD AND SHIELD by James Lee Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 18, 1971

"At the close he joins the ACLU and tends his horses."
A two-fisted-pants-hitching-cookie-cutter-day-dream for liberals who wince at being "so-called" — this is the story of Texan Hack Holland, a Korean war veteran and lawyer with natural gas on his old-family property and problems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1970

"One wishes he had done so earlier."
This is an updated down home tale that is as messy as the mines where its characters suffer. Read full book review >