Search Results: "James Peck"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 2011

"A prodigiously researched, provocative critique."
From the Cold War to the War on Terror, a historian and foreign-policy analyst charts the rise of human rights and the U.S. government's appropriation of the doctrine for its own ends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHOMSKY READER by James Peck
Released: Sept. 12, 1987

"A fascinating interview of Chomsky by Peck precedes the essays, position papers, and lectures—many revised here, some never before published—in which Chomsky focuses his iconoclastic brilliance on social and political issues ranging from the Vietnam War (opposition to which catapulted Chomsky into national prominence), the role of intellectuals in society, Skinnerian psychology, Central America, and Mideast tensions, to name a few."
Hopefully the starry-eyed introduction by Pantheon editor Peck ("In all American history, no one's writings are more unsettling than Noam Chomsky's") won't drive readers away from this otherwise intelligent compilation of representative writings by noted linguist and political radical Chomsky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRAGON'S PEARL by Sirin Phathanothai
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1994

"Less excusable is her sketchy description of her reconciliation with her father and brother, who both apparently bore her little ill will. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An unusual and often absorbing memoir of China and its leaders by a woman who, in 1956 when she was eight, was sent there with her older brother to serve as a ``bridge'' between two ostensibly hostile nations—her adopted country and her native Thailand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST CITIES by Dale Peck
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2007

Washed back nearly five-and-a-half centuries by a sudden tsunami in the usually placid Ocean of Time, pre-teen siblings Susan and Charles, first introduced in Drift House (2005), tackle a space/time storm (confusingly mislabeled a "time jetty") that is leaving a trail of destruction stretching from the Twin Towers through Pompeii and Atlantis to ancient Babylon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER BETWEEN US by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A rich tale full of magic, mystery, and surprise. (author's note) (Fiction. 12+)"
"Imagine an age when there were still people around who'd seen U.S. Grant with their own eyes, and men who'd voted for Lincoln." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN AND JOHN by Dale Peck
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Despite powerful, sometimes tender moments, then: ultimately more writing exercise than existential exploration."
Unconventionally structured novel of identity and relationship permutation: narrator John appears in alternate realities that usually involve paternal brutality and a gay lover named Martin—in a promising if somewhat insubstantial debut for a 24-year-old stylist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS FAMILY OF WOMEN by Richard Peck
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 1983

"Winey, full-bodied, gossipy, offering both calico and satin: a romantically styled winner."
By the author of Amanda/Miranda and other entertainments: a four-generational set of stout-hearted ladies—tough, wily, dwarfing their men, independent, and passing along their survivalist strengths to their daughters (often at a chilly or chary distance). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAW OF ENCLOSURES by Dale Peck
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Bleak, challenging, and impressive."
From the widely praised author of Martin and John (1993) comes another grim, affecting, and structurally ambitious work, this a blend of fiction and biography based on the lives of the author's parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REPRESENTING SUPER DOLL by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"Velma indeed is a likable girl and, as Sheri says, she doesn't miss much."
Verna is a wholesome farm girl who finds being bused to high school in industrial Dunthorpe a bit of a culture shock, but before long she is in with the girls she had aimed for and even accompanies one of them, beautiful though stupid Darlene, to her appearances in New York City as Central U.S. Teen Super Doll. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GHOST BELONGED TO ME by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: April 28, 1975

"But Peck throws in enough scary moments to prove that he'd be a winner in any campfire storytelling session, and in that spirit he will keep his audience giggling and just a little frightened at the same time."
"There are several opinions that people hold regarding ghosts, and not one of them would clinch an argument." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG WAY FROM CHICAGO by Richard Peck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Remarkable and fine. (Fiction. 9-12)"
In a novel that skillfully captures the nuances of small-town life, an elderly man reminisces about his annual trips from Chicago to his grandmother's house in rural Illinois during the Depression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST SAFE PLACE ON EARTH by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1995

"Nevertheless, this is a provocative novel about important issues. (Fiction. 12+)"
The Tobins have moved to Walden Woods because they thought they would be safe in the friendly, upscale community, with an excellent school system. Read full book review >