Search Results: "James T. Costa"


BOOK REVIEW

DARWIN'S BACKYARD by James T. Costa
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"While casual readers may not be tempted to perform the experiments, the insights Costa provides into Darwin's thinking and his revelations about the great man's working life make this a worthwhile read. A perfect resource for biology teachers."
An instructive and entertaining look at Darwin's "experimentising" and how it can be readily duplicated using mostly simple household tools. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WALLACE, DARWIN, AND THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES by James T. Costa
NON-FICTION
Released: June 2, 2014

"An illuminating, nuanced account of the parallel discovery of a theory still deemed controversial by some."
An in-depth look at the seminal contributions of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913)—often solely attributed to Charles Darwin (1809-1882)—that led "to revolutionary new understandings of earth history and of the life upon earth in the mid- to late nineteenth century." Read full book review >

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JAMES PARKS AND BEN COSTA
by Alex Heimbach

“A skeleton and a slime walk into a bar…” That may sound like the wind up to a very nerdy joke, but it’s actually the set up for a scene in James Parks and Ben Costa’s new YA graphic novel, Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli, which, to be fair, is full of very nerdy — ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 31, 2004

"Authoritative and, most helpfully, accessible."
Self-help guide for diabetes sufferers, mostly in question-and-answer format, with an emphasis on helping racial and ethnic minority diabetics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RICKETY STITCH AND THE GELATINOUS GOO by Ben Costa
Released: June 6, 2017

"Don't be fooled by the cheery illustrations; this is irreverent, bawdy, and lots of fun. (Graphic fantasy. 13-adult)"
A minstrel skeleton and his wobbly companion embark upon an epic quest to learn their origins in this gloriously ribald graphic tale. Read full book review >

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JOHN T. EDGE
by Megan Labrise

John T. Edge’s The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South is no mere paean to peanuts, homage to hominy, and laudation to lard. Like the nutritive broth for which it’s named, this title is more substantive than it appears at a glance.

“One the primary aims of my book,” says Edge, a native Georgian who lives ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DYING FOR ATTENTION by James T. Shannon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 19, 2014

"Although you have to join the hero in questioning the killer's motive, college English teacher Shannon offers well-rounded characters and a healthy dose of romance to balance out the bloodshed."
A stint of English teaching turns deadly in a New England town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Fisher's examination of that part of Dooley's life is, like the rest of the book, insightful and enlightening. (33 illustrations, not seen)"
An accomplished biography of an almost forgotten, but important, player in American Vietnam War policymaking in the mid- and late 1950s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Passion, Desire  & Contemplation  by James T. DeShay
Released: May 19, 2015

"A collection of love poems that never catches fire."
DeShay (Thoughts, Love & Reflection, 2012) returns with another volume of love poetry.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 2, 2016

"Though long, Kloppenberg's account is not exhaustive, and there is plenty of room for interpretation and annotation. A book to read, profitably, alongside Karl Popper's The Open Society and Its Enemies."
An original discussion of how the idea of democracy took root and has been transformed in the West. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"An air of dissertation pervades this book, drawn as it is form doctoral studies, and Lapsley comes across as dry and formal- -very much like the Bordeaux grape he so appreciates. (map; 23 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Forget the flowery title, a bit of whimsy from Robert Louis Stevenson. Read full book review >