Search Results: "James Wilcox"


BOOK REVIEW

HUNK CITY by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2007

"Enormous fun, and arguably the author's best since the sublime Modern Baptists."
Do-gooders and bigots, the ethically conflicted and the sexually disadvantaged, ecologists and evangelicals pair up, disentangle, rant and fret in Wilcox's fractious ninth novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POLITE SEX by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1991

"A surprisingly ordinary fiction from the otherwise gifted Wilcox, whose first venture outside Tula Springs drifts, with little humor to steer it straight."
For his fifth novel, Wilcox (Sort of Rich, 1989, etc.) leaves the everyday comedy of small-town Louisiana for more serious matters in New York City, where a few Tula Springs natives struggle with ambition and disappointment, and faith and disillusion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEAVENLY DAYS by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Tula Springs is always worth a visit, but this is minor Wilcox."
The gently mad inhabitants of fictional Tula Springs are doing what they do best—minding one another's business—in the sly Louisiana author's amiable eighth outing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUEST OF A SINNER by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 14, 1993

"But at its best, there's a Waugh-like breeziness to this delightful novel with its genial view of human frailty and its overwhelming patience with things absurd."
Wilcox's sixth novel recaptures the antic spirit of his earlier work, after the surprisingly inert Polite Sex (1991); his latest is a convivial romp through contemporary Manhattan—a comedy of errors with all sorts of sexual quandaries, not a few downright crazy characters, and a spiritual dimension to top it all off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLAIN AND NORMAL by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 1998

"Fortunately, it's also very often almost as endearing and entertaining."
Unrequited and misdirected loves are the ruefully comic matter of this sprightly seventh novel from the author of such inspired farces as Modern Baptists (1983) and Sort of Rich (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS UNDINE’S LIVING ROOM by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"Too bad his later books haven't sustained that rep."
The third in Wilcox's uproarious series of novels set in Tula Springs, Louisiana, this comedy of southern manners reminds us that Wilcox really gets his juices flowing when he's back on his native soil, far from the Manhattan of his duller, more recent books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SORT OF RICH by James Wilcox
Released: May 24, 1989

Wilcox's special fiefdom, Tula Springs, Louisiana, is so sociologically spacious that by now he's able to ship in outsiders and watch how they do there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SKYSCRAPER STORY by Charlotte Wilcox
Released: Oct. 3, 1990

Using the elegant 57-story Norwest Center in Minneapolis (completed in 1989) as an example, here's a step-by-step photo essay on how such an urban giant comes to be: choosing the site and harmonizing with it; finding the rationale and logistics of construction; putting on finishing touches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Add this to the long been-there-done-that shelf of '60s autobiography."
Reminiscences of a time that seems golden only when seen through a beer glass. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DECISION by Victoria Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2015

"A must-read for fans of the Old West."
The third book in Wilcox's (Gone West, 2014, etc.) historical fiction series finds dentist Doc Holliday heading to Tombstone, Arizona, to meet up with Wyatt Earp and his brothers for gunfights and adventures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 16, 1991

The sympathetic portraits Wilcox (Waiting for an Army to Die, 1983) paints of the Plowshares members are as flowery as the Volkswagens they drove in the 1960's, but do offer a glimpse into the hears of those on the cutting edge of the religious antinuclear movement. Read full book review >