Search Results: "Jamie Thomson"


BOOK REVIEW

JAMIE by Clare Jarrett
by Clare Jarrett, illustrated by Clare Jarrett
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2002

"A particularly affectionate tale, full of tenderness and caring for its quaintly absurd bird and her caregivers. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The surprise of caring for a strange animal is jovially chronicled in this sweet intergenerational offering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIRGIL THOMSON by Anthony Tommasini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"Tommasini had access to the relevant documents and made reasonable use of them, but his book lacks the qualities Thomson's own writings always had: wit, verve, and a sense of history. (photos, not seen)"
A generally informative biography of the influential American composer that suffers, paradoxically, from its author's intimacy with his subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHATTERBOX JAMIE by Nancy Evans Cooney
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1993

"A drama that many young ones will recognize as just their size. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Jamie is full of questions at home; but when he starts nursery school, he clams up—totally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK LORD by Jamie Thomson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"That said, the final chapters deftly set up Volume 2, already out in the U.K. It's Lord Sauron, powerless and back in middle school…fun in many ways. (Fantasy. 9-14)"
The Dark Lord of the Iron Tower of Despair at the Gates of Doom...has to go to seventh grade!? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK LORD by Jamie Thomson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 4, 2014

"Best read with its companion tome…let's just say best read; wouldn't want to anger the Dark Lord. (Humorous fantasy. 10-14)"
While the Dark Lord's away, everyone begins living in peace and harmony, much to the chagrin of the White Wizard, Hasdruban. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOKING FOR JAMIE BRIDGER by Nancy Springer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 1995

"A solid plot, strong characterizations, and the unexpected ending makes this a page-turner and a half. (Fiction. 12+)"
A suspenseful story about a feisty teen who insists on finding her roots in the face of adult duplicity and obstinacy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT JAMIE SAW by Carolyn Coman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"It's a profound characterization and a remarkable achievement in a book about ordinary people trying to put their lives in order. (Fiction. 8-10)"
An extremely intimate narrative about Jamie, nine, that opens in the middle of a traumatic scene-his mother's lover throws Jamie's baby half-sister across the room, and his mother catches her and then closely follows the state of the boy's soul as he, his mother, and the baby move out of the house and into a trailer on top of a mountain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMIE AND ANGUS TOGETHER by Anne Fine
ADVENTURE
Released: July 1, 2007

"With language suitable for good second-grade readers as well as a younger audience, these stories can stand on their own or lead readers and listeners back to the first volume. (Fiction. 5-7)"
Six self-contained chapters illustrate the strong friendship between nursery-school-aged Jamie and his stuffed Highland bull, Angus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMIE O'ROURKE AND THE POOKA by Tomie dePaola
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

BOOK REVIEW

PIDGE AND JAMIE by Marjorie Jamison Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 8, 2016

"An exhaustive family history that will likely appeal to romantics and World War I aficionados."
Through their letters, Douglas tells the story of the life and love of her parents during the turbulent World War I era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"It's difficult to imagine the average home cook not gaining wisdom, skill and confidence from this worthy addition to the Oliver Empire."
"I'm too busy." "It's too expensive." "I don't know how." Celebrity chef and author Oliver (Jamie's Food Revolution, 2011, etc.) doesn't want to hear your excuses for not preparing home-cooked meals. None of them are true anyway, and he sets out to prove it. Read full book review >